Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course - SAFE Work Manitoba

Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course - SAFE Work Manitoba

Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course Copyright 2015 by Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety, and amended by SAFE Work Manitoba. Used with permission. manitoba.ca As an inexperienced young worker, you are more likely to get

hurt on the job and have problems being paid properly than more experienced workers. manitoba.ca The Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course (YWRCC) will teach you the basics about workers' and employers' rights and responsibilities for safety, health and the employment relationship. It has important information you need to know before entering the job market.

manitoba.ca If you are 13, 14 or 15 years of age and want to work in Manitoba, you are required to: Complete the course and obtain a Certificate of Completion Provide your employer with a copy of your certificate before starting work. Your certificate must be signed by your parent or guardian. Your employer is required to keep these documents on

file. manitoba.ca Accessing the Course You can complete the Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course online at www.ywrcc.safemanitoba.com. Alternatively, you can get a hard copy of the Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course Workbook at https://www.gov.mb.ca/labour/standards/asset_library/pdf/YWRCC_Guide_and_W orkbook.pdf

or by calling Employment Standards Manitoba at 204945-3352 or 1-800-821-4307. manitoba.ca Completing the Guide and Workbook This workbook will train you on the basic rules for health, safety and the employment relationship. The course contains three modules: Understanding the World of Work Expectations at Work Workplace Safety and Health

manitoba.ca Obtaining a Certificate of Completion Once you have completed the guide and workbook, you will need to write the Certificate of Completion Test. You must score 75% or higher on the test to receive a certificate. When you pass the test online, you can print a copy of the certificate. If you intend to complete the test after using the hard copy of the workbook, call Employment Standards Manitoba at 1-800-821-4307 or 204-945-3352 and ask them to mail you a paper copy of the test.

manitoba.ca The completed test and form can then be mailed to: Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course Employment Manitoba Standards 401 York Ave. Winnipeg, MB R3C 0P8 If you pass the paper test, Employment Standard will mail a copy of your Certificate of Completion to you. If you do not pass the test, you will receive a notice in

the mail stating that you will need to re-write the test. manitoba.ca BE SURE TO: Make extra copies of your Certificate of Completion. Keep one for your records and give the others to potential employers. If you lose your Certificate or change jobs and do not have a copy, you will need to re-write the test to obtain another Certificate of Completion.

manitoba.ca MODULE 1 Understanding the World of Work manitoba.ca There are three main messages you will learn throughout this course. They are: 1. If it feels wrong, it probably is wrong. 2. Just ask.

3. There is no such thing as a stupid question. manitoba.ca What is employment? Everyday young people are involved in activities in their homes, schools, communities and at work. In this course, we're going to talk about paid work you do as an

employee. This is called 'employment'. manitoba.ca What is employment? Employment: is any task you need to do for your employer is paid involves training, rules and supervision.

manitoba.ca Activity 1.1 Do the activity on page 5 of your workbook. Circle the activities that you think are work for pay. manitoba.ca Words Used in the Workplace Aside from the word work, other words used in the workplace include: Behaviour

Consequences Expectations Job Responsibility Rules Training Wages Working Conditions manitoba.ca Activity 1.2

Do the activity on page 7 of your workbook. How much do you know about the words that are used in the workplace? Match the correct word with the 10 definitions listed. manitoba.ca What Behaviour is Acceptable at Work? Lets see how much you know about behaviours that are acceptable and unacceptable at work. manitoba.ca

Activity 1.3 Do the activity on page 8 of your workbook. Place a next to the behaviours that are acceptable and an x next to the ones that are unacceptable. manitoba.ca What are the Expectations of Employers and Employees? Workplaces are like school. Your teachers and parents have expectations of you. They expect you to get your

work done right and on time. As a worker, you expect to Employers and supervisors expect you to Your parents expect you to manitoba.ca Introduction to Formal Workplace Rules: Manitoba Employment Standards You previously learned that there are rules and expectations on behaviours at home and work.

In Manitoba, The Employment Standards Code sets out laws on the expectations of employers and employees, including their rights and responsibilities. manitoba.ca Introduction to Formal Workplace Rules: Manitoba Employment Standards The Code sets out: the least amount of money per hour that the employer can pay you (minimum wage) when you get paid

when you get a meal break, and what days you get off work. manitoba.ca Introduction to Formal Workplace Rules: Manitoba Employment Standards Employer Responsibilities:

You Responsibilities: Your employer is responsible for giving you a 30minute unpaid meal break after five hours of work. You are responsible for returning from your meal

break on time and getting permission if you need more time. Your employer is responsible for setting your work schedule. You are responsible for showing up for your shifts on time and working your scheduled

hours. Rights: Your employer has the right to expect you to take your meal break on time and return to work on time. Rights:

You have the right to have a meal break after every five hours of work. You have the right to know your work schedule. Your employer has the right to expect you to show up for work on time and work your hours as scheduled.

manitoba.ca Activity 1.4 Do the activity on page 11 of the workbook. Place each responsibility under whose responsibility it is within the workplace, whether its your responsibility, your employers responsibility, or both your employer and your responsibility. manitoba.ca

What Is Safe? At work, there are things called hazards. A hazard is any situation, activity, procedure or equipment that may hurt someone. They can make a workplace unsafe. manitoba.ca What Is Safe? Read the following scenario:

Your neighbour has offered you a job that you will be paid for. She wants you to clean out an old shed in the backyard for $20. As soon as you look in the shed, you see it is full of junk, broken glass, chemical containers and pieces of wood with nails in them. Think about the dangers: o Is it safe to ask you to do the task? o What equipment would you need to be safe? manitoba.ca Activity 1.5 Do the activity on page 12 of the workbook.

What things could happen if you clean out the supply room? Place a next to three dangerous things listed that could happen if you clean out the shed. manitoba.ca What Are the Duties and Responsibilities for Safety and Health at Work? There are rules to make sure you and other workers are safe at work. The Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Act and

Regulation outlines safety and health laws and sets the rules for keeping employees and workplaces healthy and safe. manitoba.ca What Are the Duties and Responsibilities for Safety and Health at Work? As a paid employee, you have a right to learn about health and safety. You also have a responsibility to help keep yourself and your workplace safe.

Employers and employees have rights, duties and responsibilities for safety and health under the Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Act and Regulation. manitoba.ca What Are the Duties and Responsibilities for Safety and Health at Work? Employer Responsibilities:

Your employer is responsible for providing orientation and work-related training so you can do your job safely. Your employer is responsible for correcting any unsafe conditions or activities in the workplace. You Responsibilities:

Rights: You are responsible for using all machinery, tools and equipment the way the employer trained you and asking questions when in doubt. You are responsible for reporting unsafe acts and conditions to the employer.

You are responsible for helping your employer keep the workplace safe and healthy. Rights: Your employer has the right to expect you to pay attention to the training, ask questions when in doubt and use your training on the job to work safely. Your employer has the right to expect you to report unsafe acts and conditions and help keep the workplace safe & healthy.

You have the right to receive orientation and training whenever you start a new job or are given a new task in the workplace. You have the right to work in a safe and healthy workplace. manitoba.ca Activity 1.6 Do the activity on page 14 of the workbook. Place each responsibility under whose responsibility it is within the workplace, whether its your responsibility, the

employers responsibility, or both. manitoba.ca The Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba If you are injured at work it is important that you get help and tell your supervisor. You should: 1. Get first aid. 2. Report the incident to your employer or supervisor and complete the 'Notice of Injury to Employer' form. 3. Seek medical attention if you need it. If you go to a

doctor's office or hospital, tell them this is a workplace injury. manitoba.ca The Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba Fill out the 'Worker Online Incident Report' as soon as possible. Submit it to the Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba (WCB).

manitoba.ca The Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba Workers Compensation is a workplace insurance system that provides income and medical care to workers injured at work. manitoba.ca Activity 1.7

Do the activity on page 16 of the workbook. Complete the word search by finding the words in the puzzle. manitoba.ca Summary: Module 1 You learned: what employment is and what behaviour is acceptable at work what your employer expects what is safe what are the rules for safety and health at a job

who can help. manitoba.ca MODULE 2 Expectations for the Workplace manitoba.ca Why Employment Standards Are Important The Employment Standards Code (the Code) sets rules for things like minimum wage, breaks away from work,

days off, paydays, deductions from wages and general holiday pay. manitoba.ca Things to Know and Do Before You Start Work In Manitoba, you can start working at 13 years of age if you complete the Young Worker Readiness Certificate Course (YWRCC). Once you turn 16, you don't need to take the YWRCC but there are certain industries and occupations you still

cannot work in. manitoba.ca Things to Know and Do Before You Start Work Be aware of the employment standards restrictions. If you are under 18, you cannot work: oalone between 11 pm and 6 am oin the forestry industry oin a sawmill or pulp mill

(contd) manitoba.ca Things to Know and Do Before You Start Work If you are under 18, you cannot work: o in an underground mine or the face of an open pit or quarry o in the abatement or removal of asbestos o in an enclosed or partially enclosed space that is not primarily designed for human occupancy and has

restricted means of access or egress. manitoba.ca Things to Know and Do Before You Start Work If you are 13, 14 or 15 years old, you cannot work: o between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. o for more than 20 hours during a week of school o on a construction site o in an industrial or manufacturing production process o in work involving scaffolding or swing stages

manitoba.ca Things to Know and Do Before You Start Work If you are 13, 14 or 15 years old, you cannot work: o on a drilling or servicing rig o in arboriculture, if using dangerous tools or machinery o at heights more than 1.5 meters o with herbicides or pesticides, or o without direct adult supervision.

manitoba.ca Things to Know and Do Before You Start Work If you are 13 years old, you cannot work: o in food preparation if you'd be using dangerous tools or machines. For example: with fryers, slicers, grills or knives. manitoba.ca Employment standards rules do not apply if

you are an independent contractor, or are self-employed. This may include babysitting, delivering flyers, or cleaning a yard in the neighborhood. volunteer for a charitable organization or are given work experience for a limited period of time if approved by a school board. work on a farm for a family member in the primary production of agricultural products on that farm. manitoba.ca

Activity 2.1 Do the activity on page 21 of your workbook. Indicate if the following statements are True (T) or False (F). manitoba.ca Rules for Work Conditions Before you start your job, it is important to know as much as possible about the employment standards for basic things like work hours, schedules and breaks.

manitoba.ca Rules for Work Conditions Some basic employment standards you should know are: Annual Vacation and Pay Hours of work for 13, 14 and 15 year olds Uniforms

Extra Breaks General Holidays Job-protected Meal Breaks Leaves Paydays Days Off

Work Schedules Work Week manitoba.ca Activity 2.2 Do the activity on page 24 of your workbook. Match the employment standard term to its definition on the page.

manitoba.ca Rules for Pay At work, you need to know how you will be paid for regular work hours, overtime, vacation and more. The following are terms related to pay: Deductions General Holiday Pay

Minimum Wage Overtime Pay Pay for Training Reporting Pay

Vacation Pay Wages manitoba.ca Activity 2.3 Do the activity on page 27 of your workbook. Read each question and circle the correct answer. manitoba.ca

Rules for Pay If you are unsure about how to calculate your overtime pay, public holiday pay and vacation pay, remember: Just ask. There is no such thing as a stupid question. There are many people who can help you. If you are unsure, ask your employer, your parent/guardian or you can call Employment Standards Manitoba at 1-800-8214307. manitoba.ca How to Read Your Pay Statement At work, you will be paid at least twice per month and

you must be given a pay statement. It explains what you have earned. There is information on hours worked (regular and overtime), deductions from pay, and net amount of wages paid. manitoba.ca How to Read Your Pay Statement example FIRST COME FIRST SERVE RESTAURANT Statement of Earnings and Deductions Employee Name:

Cheque Date: Earnings Description Hourly Wage Regular Overtime Premium General Holiday Vacation

Gross Pay: Pay Period: Deductions Hours Current Description YTD CPP EI Income Tax

Year to Date Current Description Amount Gross Pay Deductions Net Pay Total Deductions: Pay Date:

Net Pay: manitoba.ca How to Read Your Pay Statement example Some basic terms you should know are: Current Earnings Gross Pay

Hours Hourly Wage (rate) Net Pay Pay Date Pay Deductions

Pay Period Total Deductions YTD (Year-toDate) manitoba.ca Activity 2.4 Do the activity on page 30 of your workbook. Now that you have learned parts of a pay statement and

how to read it, review the pay statement. manitoba.ca What to Know and Do When You Leave or Lose Your Job There are a few things to do before you leave your job as well as a few things to know if you lose your job.

manitoba.ca Employees Responsibility for Notice After you have worked for the same employer for 30 days, you must give one week's notice before you leave your job. After you have worked for the same employer for one year, you must give two weeks' notice.

Notice can be written or verbal. manitoba.ca Termination With Notice Your employer can decide to terminate employment if they notify you in advance based on the chart below. You will be required to work that notice period: Period of Employment At least 30 days but less than 1 year

At least 1 year but less than 3 years At least 3 years but less than 5 years At least 5 years but less than 10 years At least 10 years Notice Period one week two weeks four weeks

six weeks eight weeks manitoba.ca Termination With Notice Notice can be written or verbal. You will either be allowed to work until your last day or you will be paid instead of notice. manitoba.ca

Pay Instead of Notice Your employer can end your employment immediately without notice. If this happens, your employer must pay you your wages for the required weeks of notice. See chart on the Termination With Notice slide. manitoba.ca Exceptions to Notice

There are some reasons you may be terminated without notice: Just cause: stealing, breaking important rules such as safety rules, or consistently failing to do your job as instructed after repeated warnings. Probation: you are employed less than 30 days. Fixed term: you are hired for the summer and know your employment ends when school starts. manitoba.ca Your Last Pay Cheque Your employer must pay you

everything you are owed within ten business days of your last day of work. This should include your last pay period of wages and any outstanding vacation pay owed to you. manitoba.ca Activity 2.5 Complete the crossword puzzle on page 33 of your

workbook. manitoba.ca How to Bring Up Concerns with Your Employer It is important to know how to talk to your employer when problems arise at work. Perhaps you found a mistake on your pay statement, or your employer has not been giving you meal breaks. When you meet with your employer, it helps if you know what you are going to say. Take some time to put your

thoughts and feelings in order so you can communicate the problem in a calm, rational way. manitoba.ca How to Bring Up Concerns with Your Employer Ask yourself: What do I see as the real problem? How do I feel about the problem? What change do I want to happen? What are some things I can do to solve the problem?

What is my strategy? manitoba.ca Making a Complaint Employment Standards recommends that you talk to your employer on any issues or concerns before contacting them. If the issue cannot be resolved, or it is difficult to approach your employer, you can contact them and file a formal complaint. The formal complaint process should be used if: o You would like to request them to conduct an investigation into a specific employment standards concern; or

o You need help recovering unpaid wages. manitoba.ca Making a Complaint Formal employment standards complaints can be submitted by mail, email or fax. manitoba.ca Activity 2.6 Do the activity on page 36 of the workbook. Unscramble the letters to make words.

manitoba.ca Summary: Module 2 You learned: why employment standards are important things to know and do before you start work rules for work conditions including breaks, uniforms and work hours (contd)

manitoba.ca Summary: Module 2 rules for pay including minimum wage, overtime and vacation pay how to read your pay stub what to do if you miss work for an injury or illness what to know and do when you leave or lose your job how to bring up concerns with your employer, and how to make a complaint. manitoba.ca

MODULE 3 Workplace Safety and Health manitoba.ca Why Health and Safety is Important at Work The Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Act and Regulation (MWSH) sets rules for workplace safety and health. Knowing your rights (things you can expect from others) and responsibilities (things you have to do) for workplace health and safety will keep you and your coworkers safe.

manitoba.ca Injuries Among Youth in the Workplace Most young people find jobs in: retail hospitality manufacturing construction manitoba.ca

Injuries Among Youth in the Workplace There are many reasons young workers get hurt at work: feeling rushed or pressured to get things done lack of training lack of supervision being distracted, and being placed in an unsafe work situation. manitoba.ca Injuries Among Youth in the Workplace Your beliefs, life situations or personality traits can also put you at risk of getting hurt. Before starting work, ask

yourself: Do I want to do my job well? Do I lack work experience and know what is safe and unsafe? Do I believe that nothing will happen to me? Do I feel comfortable asking questions at work? manitoba.ca Injuries Among Youth in the Workplace Will other things going on in my life distract me? Am I trying to juggle several things at once including school, homework, a job, family life and social life?

Do I think my boss is looking out for me? manitoba.ca Activity 3.1 Do the activity on page 40 of the workbook. Select True (T) or False (F) for the beliefs, personality traits or life situations that may lead you to get hurt at work. manitoba.ca

Who Has Rights and Responsibilities for Safety and Health Everyone including your employer, supervisor and you, are responsible for keeping the workplace safe and healthy. MWSH Act and Regulation describes the duties for everyone in the workplace. Everyone must: know what their duties are have the authority, resources and time to carry them out have the required knowledge including education, training and certification. manitoba.ca

Rights of Workers All workers have four main safety and health rights: 1. The right to know. 2. The right to participate. 3. The right to refuse dangerous work. 4. Protection from discriminatory action. manitoba.ca The Right to Know You have the right to know about what hazards there are

in your workplace and how to protect yourself. You're responsible to: attend training use safe work procedures use equipment safely, and wear any required safety equipment, known as personal protective equipment (PPE). manitoba.ca The Right to Participate You have the right to participate in safety and health activities at the workplace, including becoming a part of

the Workplace Safety and Health Committee. Youre responsible to: cooperate with your supervisor and employer report unsafe working conditions or faulty equipment manitoba.ca The Right to Refuse Dangerous Work You have the right to refuse dangerous work or tasks that you believe are dangerous to yourself or others. A dangerous situation could be similar to any of the following:

shoveling the roof at a supermarket where you are a sales clerk working on a roof during a blizzard or thunderstorm with lightning using a new chemical without training about its manitoba.ca The Right to Protection from Discriminatory Action You have a right to protection from discriminatory action when:

exercising a right under the WSH Act or Regulation testifying in a proceeding under the WSH Act giving information about workplace conditions performing duties as a member of a safety committee (contd) manitoba.ca The Right to Protection from Discriminatory Action refusing dangerous work taking reasonable action to protect your safety and

the safety and health of another person, and complying with WSH Act and Regulation and/or attempting to have the WSH Act and Regulation enforced manitoba.ca How to Refuse Dangerous Work Do not do work if you aren't trained, equipped or experienced for the job. By law, your employer cannot fire or discipline you for using your right to refuse dangerous work.

manitoba.ca How to Refuse Dangerous Work If you find yourself in a situation where you need to refuse, follow these steps: Do not do work if you aren't trained, equipped or experienced. Tell your employer or supervisor that you are refusing work because of a health or safety concern. Do not leave the worksite without your employers permission.

manitoba.ca Contact your safety and health committee or safety representative if you can't resolve the concern with the supervisor. If the concern can't be resolved at your workplace, contact a safety and health officer with the Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Branch at 204-957-7233 or toll free at 1-855-957-7233. manitoba.ca

If you find yourself in this type of situation, just say, "NO". Remember: If it feels wrong, it probably is wrong. Just ask. There is no such thing as a stupid question. manitoba.ca Activity 3.2 Do the activity on page 43 of the workbook. Fill in the blanks about safety rights and responsibilities.

manitoba.ca Responsibilities of Employers Your employer has the most responsibility for providing a safe and healthy workplace. It is your employer's responsibility to: make sure you have the correct tools and equipment and ensure they are inspected regularly and in good repair provide the personal protective equipment (e.g., work gloves, safety glasses, etc.) to do your job safely, and train you to use the tools, equipment and personal

protective equipment properly. manitoba.ca What is Workplace Orientation and Training? WSH Regulation Part 2.2.1(3) lists 11 things that employers must include and inform you about during your workplace orientation. What are they?

manitoba.ca Activity 3.3 Do the activity on page 44 in the workbook. Circle Yes (Y) or No (N) if you should ask your employer the questions. manitoba.ca What are Hazards? A 'hazard' is any situation, activity, procedure or

equipment that may harm a person. manitoba.ca What are Hazards? Your employer must tell you about hazards at work. You should ask your supervisor about hazards any time you do not know how to do a job safely. You can also report hazards to the workplace safety & health committee or to the worker safety and health representative.

If an employer or supervisor insists you do a task without training or the appropriate safety equipment, remember that you can refuse to do that task. manitoba.ca Types of Hazards There are many different types. But, they fit into two categories: safety hazards or health hazards. What is an example of a safety hazard? What is an example of a health hazard? Hazards can have short-term or long-term health effects, e.g., a broken limb might take two months to

heal, while hearing loss is a lifelong problem that can't be fixed. manitoba.ca How to Find and Fix Hazards There are 4 steps to identify, assess and control hazards: S: Spot the hazard wearing your earbuds to listen to music at work. A: Assess the risk wearing your earbuds makes it hard to hear what's going on around you. F: Find a safer way do not wear your earbuds at work. E: Every day follow safe work procedures every time at

work. manitoba.ca Activity 3.4 Do the activity on page 46 in the workbook. Identify the types of hazards and match them to their descriptions. manitoba.ca What is Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)?

The best employers and supervisors work to eliminate hazards as much as possible. Because not all hazards are eliminated, you must use personal protective equipment (PPE) when you do some work tasks. For example, in a restaurant, you may be asked to wear closed-toe, rubber-soled shoes to prevent slipping on the restaurant floor when it has been mopped. manitoba.ca What is Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)?

You may think that wearing PPE is uncomfortable to wear. Think of the consequences if you don't. Remember your rights and responsibilities for PPE: take the training the employer provides about how to use PPE learn when to use PPE and how to use it take care of the PPE that your employer gives you ask your employer to replace your PPE if it is damaged. manitoba.ca Activity 3.5 Do the activity on page 48 in the workbook.

Complete the crossword puzzle. manitoba.ca WHMIS Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System Your workplace may use many hazardous materials like paint or cleaning liquids. These things can make you sick if you don't use them properly. WHMIS also known as the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) provides information about hazardous materials in the workplace such as solids, liquids and gases.

manitoba.ca WHMIS WHMIS has 3 main parts: 1. Safety Labels 2. Safety Data Sheets (SDS) 3. Worker Education manitoba.ca WHMIS

There are 10 WHMIS hazard symbols: manitoba.ca Activity 3.6 Do the activity on page 54 in the workbook. Match the hazard symbols (left) to their classifications (right). manitoba.ca What is Harassment?

Harassment is defined in the WSH Regulation as objectionable conduct (e.g., comments, displays, actions or gestures) by a person that creates a risk to the health of a worker or conduct that adversely affects a worker's psychological or physical well-being. Part 10 of the Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Regulation mandates that employers have a harassment prevention policy. This includes harassment from coworkers, managers or customers. manitoba.ca What is Harassment?

When your employer or supervisor gives you direction or feedback about your work, it is not harassment. You can do several things if you believe you are being harassed at work: Review your employer's harassment policy and procedures. Speak with the person(s) who are harassing you. They may not realize that their conduct or display is offensive to you and they should stop. manitoba.ca What is Harassment?

If they don't stop, then do the following: o Notify your supervisor or employer; o Contact Manitoba's Workplace Safety and Health Branch for assistance at 204-957-SAFE (7233) or toll free 1-888-957-SAFE(7233). manitoba.ca Activity 3.7 Do the activity on page 56 in the workbook. Read each scenario and circle Yes (Y) if the scenario is

harassment or No (N) if the scenario is not harassment. manitoba.ca What to Do If You Are Injured at Work If you become injured at work, be sure to get help and tell your supervisor right away. Generally you should: 1. Get first aid. 2. Report the incident to your employer or supervisor and complete the 'Notice of Injury to Employer' form. 3. Seek medical attention if you need it. If you go to a doctor's office or hospital, tell them this is a workplace

injury. (contd) manitoba.ca What to Do If You Are Injured at Work 4. Fill out the 'Worker Online Incident Report' as soon as possible. Submit it to the Workers Compensation Board of Manitoba (WCB). manitoba.ca

What to Do If You Are Injured at Work Workers Compensation is a workplace insurance system that provides income and medical care to workers injured at work. manitoba.ca Who Can You Talk to if You Need Help or Information? You can raise your concerns with your Workplace Safety

and Health Committee or the Safety Representative. You can also ask your parent, guardian, or school teacher if you are unsure about your safety at work. manitoba.ca In Manitoba, the Workplace Safety & Health Committee and representative are part of the safety & health team Their duties are to: help employers identify, assess and control hazards talk with workers about health and safety concerns

make regular inspections of the workplace help investigate incidents and refusals to work, and make recommendations to the employer to improve workplace safety & health. manitoba.ca Activity 3.8 Do the activity on page 58 in the workbook. Complete the word search and find the hidden phrase. manitoba.ca

Summary Module 3 You learned: why safety and health is important at work what is personal protective equipment (PPE) where youth are permitted to work what is WHMIS

who has rights and responsibilities for safety at work how to refuse dangerous work what is orientation and training what are hazards what is harassment what to do if you are injured at work, and

who to go to for help or information about safety & health. manitoba.ca Complete the test! You must score 75% to pass the test. Good luck and dont forget to print your Certificate of Completion at the end! manitoba.ca

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