Trinity Board of Trustees

Trinity Board of Trustees

Envision Trinity 2020: Envision Trinity 2020: Strategic Plan 2013-2020 Strategic Plan 2013-2020 Appendices supporting plan goals Appendices supporting plan goals 1 BY THE YEAR 2020 TRINITY WILL: INTRODUCTION Envision Trinity 2020 establishes the framework for institutional, operational and programmatic strategies to fulfill Trinitys strategic goals. This plan emanates from Trinitys mission and vision to sustain Trinity as a global model for the education of students, particularly women and men in urban centers, who seek to become leaders for change in their families, workplaces and communities. This strategic plan continues the threads established in Trinitys prior strategic plans from Toward Trinity 2000 (1992-1999), Beyond Trinity 2000 (2000-2006), and Achieving Trinity 2010 (2007 2013). Continuing the same format as the prior plans, Envision Trinity 2020 establishes new measurable goals and clear benchmarks for achievement of the goals. Each goal includes a statement of baseline measurements in the Year 2014 and establishes annual progress goals and ultimate strategic goal targets for 2020. Enroll 3300 students in all units and programs Meet or exceed financial benchmarks Offer fully enrolled programs in each academic unit that meet or exceed contemporary academic and professional standards for outcomes, delivered in all contemporary formats and meeting benchmarks for retention and completion Sustain a fully digital and virtual campus with pervasive portable technologies facilitating delivery of instruction and services across all units and departments, reaching students and graduates worldwide Employ a body of faculty and staff of the size and capacity necessary to deliver the quality and scope of programs and services Have an administrative structure, leadership and management capacity sufficient to ensure effective delivery of Trinitys programs and services Create and manage a body of intellectual and informational resources adequate to support the academic enterprise and that also contribute significantly to the advancement of knowledge in the respective disciplines Be a national model for exceptional services to students and the larger community Meet or exceed external standards for quality and outcomes Operate in a new academic center, upgraded Main Hall and residential facilities, and have a plan in place for library redevelopment 2 Trinity Mission Statement Trinity Mission Statement Trinity is a comprehensive university offering a broad range of educational programs that prepare students across the lifespan for the intellectual, ethical and spiritual dimensions of contemporary work, civic and family life.

Trinitys core mission values and characteristics emphasize: Commitment to the Education of Women in a particular way through the design and pedagogy of the historic undergraduate womens college, and by advancing principles of equity, justice and honor in the education of women and men in all other programs; Foundation for Learning in the Liberal Arts through the curriculum design in all undergraduate degree programs and through emphasis on the knowledge, skills and values of liberal learning in all graduate and professional programs; Integration of Liberal Learning with Professional Preparation through applied and experiential learning opportunities in all programs; Grounding in the mission of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur and the Catholic tradition, welcoming persons of all faiths, in order to achieve the larger purposes of 3 learning in the human search for meaning and fulfillment. Trinitys Strategic Vision Proceeding from mission, Trinitys vision anticipates developing the institution as a mid-sized university (3,500 students) with a distinctive focus on the educational needs of women and men across all ages and economic circumstances, with a particular emphasis on education for students in the Washington metropolitan region. Trinity sustains its historic emphasis on womens leadership and advancement even while expanding its reach to include men in all professional programs. Trinitys programs and services incorporate these values that emanate from Trinitys mission as a Catholic institution infused with the values of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur: A Value-Centered Education infused with the principles of social justice, honor and integrity will continue to characterize Trinitys learning environment and programs; Ensuring Access to Educational Opportunities will continue to arise from that social justice value center, such that Trinity will continue to develop its curricula and programs in ways that provide opportunities for educational attainment for students who might otherwise not have had such opportunities to succeed academically; Respect for Human Dignity will continue to characterize Trinitys campus life through honoring the broad diversity of races, ethnicities, cultures, languages, abilities, beliefs and interests of Trinitys student body; Academic Excellence and Rigor will continue to characterize the expectations and work of the faculty with all student populations, with a clear focus on educational outcomes that can demonstrate the quality and durability of a Trinity education through many different occupations and life circumstances; Womens Leadership Development will continue to be a distinctive characteristic of all Trinity educational programs; Education for Global Leadership will continue as Trinitys theme to signify the global perspective that Trinity expects its students and graduates to manifest in order to be true leaders in contemporary communities, corporations, schools and public arenas; Service to Others will continue as a strong focus of Trinitys programs and leadership development philosophy; Educating Children Well will continue to be a particular emphasis of a Trinity education, not only in the School of Education but through all programs that lay the foundation for successful teaching, parenting and role modeling for the next generations of citizen leaders. 4 School of Education School of Business and Graduate Studies College of Arts and Sciences Trinity Strategic Paradigm 2015-2020 School of Nursing and Health Professions School of Professional Studies 5 Trinity Strategic Paradigm 5 Academic Units Central Support Services Finance Operations Advancement NO SILOS Model is deliberately

a venn diagram to foster collaboration among and across units Academic and Student Services Admissions and Enrollment Services 6 Strategic Overview: Trinity We We have have aa carefully carefully considered considered set set of of strategic strategic goals goals that that have have evolved evolved for for the Enrollment the last last two two decades. decades. Enrollment remains remains as as Goal Goal #1 #1 because because without without critical critical mass, mass, Trinity Trinity is is unable unable to to fulfill fulfill mission mission with with quality quality and and consistency. consistency. All All other other goals goals support support enrollment enrollment and and mission. mission. ALL ALL Divisions, Divisions, Departments, Departments, programs programs and and services services are are part part of of the the master master strategic strategic plan plan and and must must support support and and work work with with this this plan, plan, not not some some other other plan. plan.

Middle Middle States States Self-Study Self-Study is is aa time time to to review review progress progress toward toward goals, goals, assess assess challenges challenges and and opportunities, opportunities, revise revise objectives objectives and and tactics tactics to to fulfill fulfill goals. goals. 7 Development of Trinitys Diversified Model in Relation to Enrollment Growth (Backdrop) Showing Strategic Plan Periods Along bottom 2500 2000 1991: 1991: First First establishment establishment of of two two distinct distinct units: units: College College of of Arts Arts & & Sciences Sciences (CAS) (CAS) for for the the full-time full-time daytime daytime womens womens college, college, School School of of Professional Professional Studies Studies (SPS) (SPS) for for the the part-time part-time adult adult undergrad undergrad programs programs and and graduate graduate programs programs in in Education Education 1500 2000: 2000: Split Split out out Education Education programs programs from from SPS, SPS, creation creation of of a a three-unit

three-unit university university with with CAS, CAS, SPS SPS and and the the School School of of Education Education (EDU) (EDU) th 2014: 2014: 5 5th unit unit Business Business + + Grad Grad Studies Studies -- BGS BGS 2010: 2010: Add Add School School of of Nursing/Health Nursing/Health Profs Profs creating creating 4 4 units: units: CAS, CAS, SPS, SPS, EDU, EDU, NHP NHP 2004: 2004: Adoption Adoption of of university university name name 1000 500 Beyond Trinity 2000 Strategic Plan Toward Trinity 2000 Envision Trinity 2020 Achieving Trinity 2010 Prior to 1991 (1900-1991) Trinity College was one unit 0 8 2014 1 0 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008

2007 2006 2005 2004 CAS 2003 2002 EDU 2001 2000 SPS 1999 1998 1997 BGS 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1987 1986 1985 1981 1980 1979 1978 1968 1967 1966 1961 NHP BOARD OF TRUSTEES Trinity Functional Organization Chart 2015 (May 2015) PRESIDENT PAT MCGUIRE ACADEMIC ACADEMIC AFFAIRS AFFAIRS PROVOST/VPAA Carlota Ocampo FACULTY CAS DEAN CAS Pamela Barnett FACULTY SPS DEAN SPS Nevada Winrow FACULTY BGS DEAN BGS

Jeannette Frett DEAN NHP FACULTY NHP Mary Romanello FACULTY EDU STUDENT STUDENT AFFAIRS AFFAIRS ADMISSIONS ADMISSIONS VP STUDENT AFFAIRS Karen Gerlach VP ADMISSIONS Michael OLeary VP ENROLLMENT Cathy Geier DEAN OF STUDENT SERVICES MICHELE BOWIE CAS ADMISSIONS Arianne Martin ENROLLMENT SVC Charles Burt CAMPUS MINISTRY LYNN MYRICK HEALTH SERVICES ENROLLMENT ENROLLMENT SVCS SVCS SPS/BGS-EDU-NHP FINANCIAL AID ADMISSIONS Stephanie Krusemark REGISTRAR SUSIE POWERS General General Counsel Counsel Sarah Sarah Phelps Phelps ADVANCEMENT ADVANCEMENT FIINANCE FIINANCE CFO Barbara Lettiere BUSINESS OFFICE JARED BASCO VP ADVANCEMENT ANN PAULEY CREATIVE SVCS Timothy Russell DEAN EDU Janet Stocks CONTINUING ED Diane Miranda [email protected] Beverly Lucas ATHLETICS Amy Olson RESIDENCE LIFE CAT HOPKINS OPERATIONS OPERATIONS VP TECH SERVICES Michael Burback VP HR Carole King SECURITY

Kelvin Contee VP ADMINISTRATION Michael Malewick FACILITIES TIM KNIGHT (Aramark) CONFERENCES Brittany Irvine TRINITY CENTER Shae Agee VP DEVELOPMENT Kathleen Zeifang FOOD SVC Gretchen Westgren (Sodexho) ANNUAL FUND Marisel Morales BOOKSTORE (Barnes & Noble) ALUMNAE AFFAIRS Margy Reagan Faculty Services Lawander McFarland Library Jacob Berg ACADEMIC SERVICES Kimberly LaBoone Academic Assessment and Institutional Research 9 Trinity Key Enrollment Performance Indicators Fall 2014 Plan Enrollment FALL 2015 FALL 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Fall 2011 Fall 2010 Fall 2009 Fall 2008 Fall 2007 Fall 2006 3000 2142 2271 2500 2664 2555 2311 2030 1736 1640 1605 Retention (S-F) 90% 80%

79% 79% 79% 81% 82% 82% 80% 80% 78% Retention (F-F) 80% 71% 70% 72% 73% 72% 72% 71% 70% IPEDS GRAD RATE (COHORT YR) 55% 45% (2008) 34% (2007) 32% (2006) 45% (2005) 35% (2004) 38%/41% (2003) 40% (2002) 36% (2001) SUCCESS RATE (COHORT YR) 70% 62% (2008) 59% (2007) 57% (2006) New CAS 350 296 363 363 346

367 334 328 263 270 188 1100 1017 1066 1079 1038 1006 962 810 659 648 583 365 326 344 302 250 305 315 277 235 249 190 50% (425) 34% 32% 28% 26% 30% 33% 34% 36% 38% 33% incr @ 3% $22,370 $21,930 $20,970 $20,550 $20,150 $19,750

$19,360 $18,800 $18,250 $17,700 Not > 40% $8,948 $8,772 $8,388 $8,220 est. $7,575 $7,269 $6,886 $6,294 $6,249 75% 70% 70% 65% 60% 51% 68% 62% CAS TOTAL Housing % CAS FT Res FT Tuition Trinity Grant Pell Grant % Fiscal Years: Total Operating Revenues Total Expenses FY15 $ $ Changes in unrestricted net assets from operating activities Total Assets Total Liabilities Total Net Assets Success Rate is the measure of degree attainment or continuing enrollment for students in the baseline cohort who are still enrolled at Trinity or who have graduated from Trinity, or who are still enrolled or have graduated from another college. KEY FINANCIAL INDICATORS FY12 FY11 FY14 FY13 34,013,169 $ 31,384,883 $ 36,311,193 $ 35,988,929 $ 32,287,938 30,787,792 $ 29,361,365 $ 27,392,062 101,479,444 $ 23,616,312 $

77,863,132 $ FY10 FY09 FY08 FY07 FY06 $ 29,056,328 $ 26,252,051 $ 24,878,042 $ 25,293,465 $ 23,607,883 $ 24,091,750 $ 23,388,541 $ 23,313,620 $ 23,348,394 $ 23,536,793 $ 6,627,564 $ 4,895,876 $ 2,804,277 $ $ $ $ 86,170,872 $ 72,960,840 $ 66,464,778 23,154,959 $ 24,272,886 $ 24,289,184 63,015,913 $ 48,687,954 $ 42,175,594 $ 58,573,525 $ 24,433,342 $ 34,140,183 $ 53,860,492 $ 23,868,840 $ 29,991,652 $ $ 2,628,286 5,523,401 $ $ $ 52% (2000) (415,423) (483,867) $ 59,059,174 $ 23,486,521 $ 35,572,653 74,921 $ 60,660,284 $ 23,869,456 $ 36,790,828 (188,399) $ 58,424,520 $ 24,214,907 $ 34,209,613 10 Trinity Key Academic and Personnel Performance Indicators Fall 2014 Plan Faculty Salaries FT Instruction (Fac + Instrs) PT Faculty FALL 2015

Fall 2013 Fall 2012 Fall 2011 Fall 2010 Fall 2009 Fall 2008 Fall 2007 100% $69,290 100% $68,500 99% $66,200 98% $64,200 96% $63,600 96% $61,800 95% $60,400 96% $58,000 96% $56,000 130 (65% courses by FT fac) 77 (59 + 18) 88 (67+21) 83 (63 + 20) 76 65 59 57 54 53 40% of courses 229 230 213 192 164 134 136 133 122 599 642

637 597 532 501 463 427 42% 45% 45% 48% 50% 55% 65% Total Employees 549 518 478 456 FT STAFF 193 205 200 183 182 178 171 21% 16% 17% 14% 18% 25% Staff Turnover Fall 2006 95% of cohort avg # Courses Taught % Courses Taught by FT FALL 2014 15% Other Key Performance Indicators Cohort Default Rate 12.7% 14.2% 11 Strategic Goal 1: Enrollment The following slides illustrate the details for enrollment growth by

academic unit out to 2020 12 Enrollment Growth and Plan to 2020 3600 3400 3200 3000 2800 2600 2400 2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 pl2020 pl2019 pl2018 pl2017 pl2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974 1973 1972 1971 1970

1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958 1957 1956 1955 1954 1953 1952 1951 1950 1949 1948 1920 1919 1917 1914 1903 1902 1901 1900 10 NHP BGS SP S EDU CAS Trinity Enrollment Patterns 1900 to 2015 3000 2800 2600 2400 2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994

1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974 1973 1972 1971 1970 1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958 1957 1956 1955 1954 1953 1952 1951 1950 1949 1948 1920 1919 1917 1914 1903 1902 1901 1900 10 CAS EDU SPS BGS NHP STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT PLANNING Headcount 2013-2020 (UPDATED 10 2 2015) STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MODEL SHOWING TOTAL FORECASTS BY ACADEMIC UNITS AND DEGREE LEVELS AS OF 10/2/2015 FISCAL 2013 Fall 12 Act FISCAL 2014 Sp 13 Act Fall 13 ACT FISCAL 2015 SP 14 ACT Fall 2014 ACT FISCAL 2016 SP 15 ACT Fall 2015 ACT FISCAL 2017

SP 16 Fall 2016 FISCAL 2018 SP 17 Fall 2017 FISCAL 2019 SP 18 Fall 2018 FISCAL 2020 SP 19 Fall 2019 FY 2021 SP 20 Fall 2020 1038 969 1078 978 1066 955 991 895 1110 990 1180 1050 1165 1030 1170 1085 1215 SPS AA 82 77 83 78 86 96 81 85 80 75 80 75 75 70

80 75 90 SPS UG 518 479 471 426 409 375 385 365 370 355 355 370 410 375 375 360 425 BGS GR BGS MBA 249 222 207 186 157 145 131 135 190 205 255 300 340 370 425 425 460 95 82 78 69 49 36 42

50 60 65 90 95 120 115 145 130 135 248 213 192 157 116 84 81 85 95 100 120 110 115 115 125 120 152 10 29 29 38 36 36 35 37 25 34 27 50 45 45 35 73 24 26 47

35 40 35 50 45 45 35 73 4 23 45 60 85 85 105 95 140 150 165 CAS NHP NRS NHP OTA NHP OTM NHP RNMSN EDU TOTAL 434 401 368 340 350 325 367 325 345 350 350 370 380 385 410 390 425 2664 2453 2506 2263

2271 2052 2142 2024 2379 2260 2589 2517 2810 2645 2960 2805 3213 15 FALL ENROLLMENT HEADCOUNTS SINCE FALL 2001 NUMBER OF STUDENTS Actual 3600 Projected 3400 3213 3200 2960 3000 2810 2800 2555 2600 2400 205 2305 2200 1618 1605 1640 664 682 668 656 693 684 1200 154 206 944 554 495 893 784 427

378 495 434 368 350 2142 145 173 466 367 595 279 460 224 570 345 250 515 450 345 435 485 455 350 380 410 1180 1165 1170 425 333 800 476 404 472 436 352 325 312 1038 1078 1066 1017 1100 2012 2013 2014 2015 pl2016 808

996 2011 2008 2004 640 2007 2003 526 631 2006 519 560 2005 505 2002 423 551 957 2010 409 400 200 927 2379 2271 320 pl2019 1637 1659 1327 1400 600 221 355 pl2018 1645 2506 285 970 1736 2589 pl2017 1800 1000 248 2034 2000 1600

2664 463 1215 0 EDU SP S BGS NHP pl2020 2009 2001 CAS 16 11 Strategic Enrollment Growth Volume and Rates 2012-2015 26% growth projected 2013-2020 12% 4000 7% 5% 3136 3500 434 2500 248 344 2000 600 1500 1038 1000 3000 2879 480 2790 3000 2664 2506 401 368 304 556 221 285 554 186 154 255 206 504 1078 969 350

978 355 165 260 225 230 255 340 450 470 1160 430 365 450 460 1260 1097 286 275 250 250 410 510 380 490 411 345 395 430 450 425 520 452 460 1318 1200 1188 495 455 455 525 485 1245 1125 1225 505 450 455 435 425 405 290 495 1066

465 425 390 340 223 2480 2271 3350 605 520 1240 1135 980 500 0 EDU NHP BGS SPS CAS 17 Is that kind of growth achievable? Consider how growth occurred retrospectively: 18 FALL ENROLLMENT HEADCOUNTS SINCE FALL 2001 NUMBER OF STUDENTS Actual 100% 3600 3400 Projected 26% 3350 100% growth since 2001 3136 3200 3000 65% growth since 2005 (7 yrs) 3000 2879 2800 2790 2664 2555 2600 2400 2506 2480 2271 2305 2200 2034 2000

1800 1600 1645 1637 1659 1618 1605 1640 1736 1327 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 pl2020 pl2019 pl2018 pl2017 pl2016 EDU pl2015 2014 NHP 2013 BGS 2012 SP S 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 CAS 19 11 How did Trinity achieve 100% growth over the last decade? 20 KEY FACTORS SUPPORTING TRINITYS GROWTH SINCE 1999 2500 2400 2300 1999: 1999: MILLHISER

MILLHISER CHALLENGE CHALLENGE FOR FORTRINITY TRINITY CENTER CENTER 2001: 2001: KRESGE KRESGE CHALLENGE CHALLENGE 2004: 2004: Centennial Centennial Campaign Campaign Concludes Concludes @ @ $12.2 $12.2 million million 2200 2003: 2003: TRINITY TRINITY CENTER CENTER OPENS OPENS 2100 2000: 2000: BOND BONDISSUE ISSUE GROUNDBREAKING GROUNDBREAKING CENTENNIAL CENTENNIALENDS ENDS 2000 1900 2007: 2007: CAS CAS NEW NEW FIRST FIRST YEAR YEARAND AND GEN GEN ED ED 2006: 2006: NURSING NURSING PROGRAM PROGRAM BEGINS BEGINS 2007-2010: 2007-2010: OTHER OTHER NEW NEW PROGRAM PROGRAM ELEMENTS: ELEMENTS: CRIMINAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE, JUSTICE, ISS, ISS, MOODLE MOODLE PLATFORM

PLATFORM XPANSION XPANSION OF OF HYBRID HYBRID OFFERINGS OFFERINGS 1800 1700 1600 1500 1400 1300 1200 2006: 2006: STRATEGIC STRATEGIC PLAN PLANACHIEVING ACHIEVING TRINITY TRINITY2010 2010DRIVES DRIVES PROGRAMMATIC PROGRAMMATIC EXPANSION EXPANSION 2004: 2004: UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY BECOMES BECOMESPART PARTOF OF TRINITYS TRINITYSNAME NAME 2000: 2000: STRATEGIC STRATEGIC PLAN PLANBEYOND BEYOND TRINITY TRINITY2000 2000 REORGANIZES REORGANIZES TRINITY TRINITYINTO INTOTHREE THREE ACADEMIC ACADEMICUNITS UNITS 2010: 2010: SCHOOL SCHOOL OF OF NURSIN NURSIN G G AND ANDHEALTH HEALTH PROFESSIONS PROFESSIONS LAUNCHED LAUNCHED 1100 1000 2002: 2002: START START MODERNIZATION MODERNIZATIONOF OF FINANCIAL FINANCIALSYSTEMS, SYSTEMS, IMPROVED IMPROVEDFINANCIAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT,

MANAGEMENT, CONVERSION CONVERSIONOF OF INFORMATION INFORMATION PLATFORM PLATFORM 900 800 700 600 500 2000: 2000: DC DCTAG TAG DC DC CAP CAP 2010: 2010: CONCEPT CONCEPT DESIGN DESIGN AND AND NEW NEW CAMPAIGN CAMPAIGN PLAN PLAN DC DC BON/CCNE BON/CCNE accredit accredit NCATE NCATE first first accreditation accreditation 400 300 Middle Middle States States Reaccreditation Reaccreditation 200 100 0 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 21 What does the map for growth include for the next seven years? 22 ENROLLMENT GROWTH DRIVERS 2013-2020 TOTAL HEADCOUNT

3600 2506 2271 2480 2879 2790 3000 3136 3350 3400 TRINITYONLINE RISES AGAIN!! 3200 3000 2800 EDU: NEW PROGRAMS 2600 NHP: NEW PROGRAMS 2400 TRINITY TRINITY ACADEMIC ACADEMIC CENTER CENTER OPENS OPENS 2200 2000 1800 1600 SPS: NEW UG PROGRAMS 1400 BGS: BUSINESS AND GRAD PGMS 1200 1000 800 600 400 CAS NEW PROGRAMS AND PROJECT COMPLETION 200 0 EDU pl2020 NHP pl2019 SP S pl2018 BGS pl2017 pl2016 pl2015 2014 2013

CAS 23 Enrollment: Assumptions, Risks Assumptions Retention improvement 2-5 % pts in each sector thru: Focus on strategic retention management, including implementation of case management approach Improved academic advising Improved learning skills support Improved services Stronger financial supports including pricing strategies, incentives for completion Admissions meets goals Strategic academic program initiatives implemented on time Trinity academic center opens by 2016 Successful capital campaign Financing secured Construction proceeds on time Risks Attrition gets worse due to: Student dissatisfaction New competition Financial conditions Academic failures Major reputational disaster Admissions fails to meet goals Capital Campaign Fails Academic Center Delayed Strategic innovation stalls while the rest of the market moves faster DC TAG and related DC sources of student support disappear Major changes to federal financial aid availability, regulations Nursing fails to improve NCLEX scores and DCBON takes debilitating action 24 Enrollment Goals: Retention and Completion 25 Fall-to-Fall Retention Rates Fall 2007 to Fall 2014 GOALS F-F: 200 7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

2014 2015 2016 Total 70% 71% 72% 75% 73% 72% 70% 71% 75% 78% 80% CAS 68% 67% 72% 76% 73% 71% 69% 70% 75% 78% 80% SPS UG 67% 73% 71% 73% 68% 66% 64% 69% 70% 72% 75% BGS 73% 80% 76% 77% 76% 76%

74% 82% 80% 82% 85% EDU 73% 73% 68% 75% 74% 74% 74% 72% 80% 82% 85% 94% 85% 77% 78% 88% 90% 92% NHP 26 2006-2014 Retention Rates Total Enrollment Fall-Spring, Spring-Fall, Fall-Fall 100 90 80 70 84 85 80 70 87 84 82 80 71 72 87 82 87 81 75 84 79 73 72 86

79 78 70 71 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 07 F07 S08 F08 S09 F09 S10 F10 S11 F11 S12 F12 S13 F13 S14 F14 S 6/ 06/ 07/ 07/ 08/ 08/ 09/ 09/ 10/ 10/ 11/ 11/ 12/ 12/ 13/ 13/ 0 F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F 27 Trinity Full-Time First-Time Cohort Completion and Continuing Enrollment/Attrition at Trinity or Elsewhere with Clearinghouse Data Time since starting: 7 yrs Starting Cohort Fall Semester: 2006 Count 6 yrs 2006 Percent 2007 Count 5 yrs 2007 Percent 2008 Count 4 yrs 2008 Percent 2009 Count 3 yrs 2009 Percent 2010 Count 2 yrs 2010 Percent 2011 Count 2011 Percent Earned AA at another inst 3

2% 1 1% 3 2% 2 1% 2 1% 0 0% Earned BA at another inst 23 13% 13 6% 6 3% 2 1% 0 0% 0 0% Earned Cert at another insti Earned BA at Trinity (~ IPEDS GRAD RATE) 0 0% 0 0% 1 0% 1 0% 2 0% 0 0% 55 32% 75 34% 78 40% 45 19% 1

0% 0 0% Still Enrolled at another Inst 14 8% 35 16% 24 12% 43 18% 46 17% 52 20% 4 2% 10 5% 21 11% 65 27% 132 49% 150 57% Financial Hold 27 15% 48 22% 30 15% 25 10% 23 9% 24 9% Left not in good academic standing 16 9% 12 5%

16 8% 9 4% 16 6% 15 6% Left on academic probation 17 10% 12 5% 12 6% 33 14% 32 12% 5 2% Left in good standing 15 9% 16 7% 6 3% 15 6% 14 5% 17 6% 174 100% 221 100% 197 100% 240 100% 268 99% 263 100% Count

Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent 99 57% 134 60% 133 68% 158 66% 183 68% 202 77% 2006 2006 2007 2007 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Still Enrolled at Trinity TOTAL Still Enrolled or Graduated ALL Top Transfer Schools: UMUC UDC UDC MCC UDC UDC UMCP

UMCP PG UDC MCC MCC UDC PGCC Bowie Bowie UMCP UMCP Howard MCC Howard PGCC CSoMd Strayer 28 Trinity Cohort Completion and Continuing Enrollment/Attrition With Clearinghouse Data for Cohorts from Fall 2006 to Fall 2011 And Pell Grant Completion Rates for 2006 and 2007 Cohorts 120% 100% 9% 10% 80% 60% 9% 15% 57% 8% 40% 13% 30% 2% 7% 5% 5% 22% 60% 16% 6% 3% 6% 6% 5% 8% 14% 12% 4% 6% 15% 68% 10%

66% 68% 9% 18% 17% 12% 3% 11% 1% 6% 2% 6% 77% 9% 20% 0% 0% 33% 5% Good ACST ACAPRO Bad ACST Fin Hold Enroll Other BA Other AA Other Enroll Trinity BA Trinity Success Rate Pell Completion 27% 57% 49% 20% 32% 34% 40% 19% 0% 2006 2007 2008 2009 0% 0% 2010 2011 First Time Full Time Cohort Initial Enrollment Fall On the columns above, the dark purple is the completion rate at Trinity, the light purple is still enrolled at Trinity, the blues are completed or still enrolled at other institutions, and the red line and number is the success rate. The cohorts that began in 2006-2007-2008 have largely finished degrees by now. The cohorts for 2009-2010-2011 are mostly still in school. Above the line, the columns show attrition because of money (green) or academic reasons. 29 TRINITY IPEDS GRADUATION RATE AND TRANSFER COUNTS AND RATES 2000-2013 Student Right to Know Rates REPORTING YEARS Cohort Start Year FTFT Enrolled 6 Yr Graduated Rate 2000 102 53 52% 2001

116 42 36% 2002 174 69 40% 2003 156 59 38% 2004 144 50 35% 2005 124 56 45% 2006 174 53 30% Four Year Grad Four Year Transfer Total 2000 to 2007 2007 221 1211 75 457 34% 38% 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 35% 22% x 36% 31% x 39% 33% x 37% 37% 41% 35% 2013 x x 30 INSTITUTION CHEYNEY BENNETT DILLARD SOJOURNERD BOWIE NORFSTATE VASTU MORGAN LINCOLNPA JNSNCSMTH TRINITY

DELSTATE XAVIERLA UMES OLADYLAKE UDC MTSTMRYCA MERCY CNR HERITAGEWA MARYGROVE COLUMBIASC WESLEYANGA BARRY CHESTNUT CSE ALVERNO NDDENCA NDMD URSULINE MRYMTMAN MBALDWIN GEORGIAN IMMACULATA CEDARCRST UNSTJOE CARLOW CHATHAM HCT WOMEN WHITE 1433 52% 793 100% 1447 72% 1916 88% 6430 64% 8318 66% 6757 61% 9027 61% 2393 61% 1886 61% 3103 91% 4406 63% 3875 71% 5064 58% 2870 73% 11000 62% 3205 90% 15786 72% 5886 90% 1447 75% 3345 76% 1495 96% 839 96% 10673 66% 2621 73% 2047 89% 2919 98% 2368 69% 3887 87% 1866 88% 2212

78% 2226 93% 3000 87% 5418 77% 2043 94% 3228 91% 3453 84% 2676 87% BLACK 1% 0% 0% 2% 4% 5% 4% 4% 2% 1% 5% 14% 6% 15% 22% 6% 14% 32% 8% 33% 44% 51% 40% 17% 47% 47% 59% 36% 64% 64% 60% 61% 60% 77% 71% 55% 47% 67% HISPANIC 93% 94% 93% 92% 87% 83% 83% 83% 80% 74% 69% 70% 73% 69% 10% 57% 8% 24% 38% 1% 45% 39% 34% 18% 29% 19% 17% 6% 24% 26% 10% 21% 9% 13% 8% 7%

13% 9% 3% 2% 1% 1% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 5% 10% 5% 2% 2% 55% 7% 51% 27% 12% 47% 1% 4% 3% 17% 6% 13% 14% 24% 5% 2% 17% 4% 9% 4% 9% 7% 1% 2% B+H PELL FROSH 06 GRAD RATE TUITION Women's C. 96% 85% 23% 8,802 96% 91% 37% 16,974X 94% 83% 31% 1,477 93% 53% 22% 7,920 89% 59% 35% 6,600 85% 72% 34% 6,860 84% 67% 42% 7,420 84% 67% 42% 7,420 81% 64% 37% 9,590 79% 66% 42% 18,326 79% 75% 30% 21,125X 75% 61% 33%

7,336 75% 70% 51% 18,700 71% 65% 32% 6,713 65% 74% 27% 23,420 64% 64% 15% 7,244 59% 65% 57% 32,894X 51% 74% 29% 17,556XX 50% 89% 28% 30,380X 48% 95% 21% 16,500 46% 84% 15% 18,900XX 43% 66% 46% 22,030X 37% 48% 48% 19,000X 35% 59% 41% 28,160XX 35% 31% 47% 30,165XX 32% 75% 54% 29,900X 31% 75% 39% 22,126X 30% 52% 47% 30,500 29% 47% 48% 34,850X 28% 54% 53% 25,790X 27% 29% 40% 25,648XX 25% 53% 49% 28,020X 18% 59% 49% 28,040XX 17% 37% 53% 29,000XX 17% 58% 61% 31,596X

14% 43% 58% 31,826X 14% 56% 56% 24,438X 11% 55% 59% 31,352X Catholic C. HBCU XP X X X XP XP XP XP X X X XP X XP X XP X XX X X X X X X X X X XX X X X X XX=historic women's or Catholic college XP=Public HBCU 31 Chart One: Select Cohort Sorted first by IPEDS Grad Rate for Fall 2006 Cohort then showing Pell Frosh and and Enrollment of White/Black/Hispanic Students 100% 100% 90% 90% 80% 80% 70% 70% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20%

20% 10% 10% 0% 0% HISPANIC BLACK WHITE PELL FROSH 06 GRAD RATE UDC M ARYGROVE HERITAGEWA SOJOURNERD CHEYNEY OLADYLAKE CNR M ERCY TRINITY DILLARD UM ES DELSTATE NORFSTATE BOWIE LINCOLNPA BENNETT ALVERNO M RYM TMAN BARRY JNSNCSM TH M ORGAN VASTU COLUM BIASC CHESTNUT NDDENCA NDMD WESLEYANGA M BALDWIN GEORGIAN XAVIERLA IM MACULATA URSULINE CSE CARLOW M TSTM RYCA UNSTJOE CHATHAM CEDARCRST 32 Strategic Goal 3: Strategic Program Initiatives The following slides present details of the strategic program initiatives in each academic unit 33 College of Arts and Sciences Strategic Initiatives Strategies to Improve First-to-Second Year Retention with Revised First Year Experience 1. Revise First Year Curriculum 2. Improve First Year Academic Support 3. Enhance Faculty Development: Pedagogy for Student Success Success in the Sciences: Undergraduate Research

Opportunities International Affairs: Expand Study Abroad Opportunities and Related Initiatives 34 NHP Strategic Initiatives Master of Science : Occupational Therapy Master of Science in Nursing Articulation Agreements Dual degree Programs 35 School of Professional Studies Strategic Initiatives Early Childhood Education Outside Grant/Scholarship Funding Community College Articulation Partnerships: Marthas Table, Marys Center Business Administration Partnerships: DCHR, Hotel Assn., BIG, etc. Community College Articulation Psychology: Major Added Health Sciences: Link to OTA for BA/BS pathway into advanced health degrees 36 School of Business and Graduate Studies Strategic Initiatives New Program in Strategic Communication and Media Studies Reform of the MBA Program Reform of the Masters in International Security Studies Refocus MSA Program Improved Career Services for Graduate Students 37 School of Education Strategic Initiatives Early Childhood Education CACREP Accreditation for Masters in Counseling Program Masters in Educational Policy Review and Redesign of Secondary Education Programs Teacher Education Assessment 38 The following graphs are simply models showing how relatively modest achievement in the strategic program initiatives can build on top of relatively stable steady-state baseline enrollment in each unit. The initiatives do not replace existing enrollments but add to them. Unlike the earlier enrollment model (Slide 38) which is somewhat more precise, the following models do not present precise goals but rather show estimates of possible growth in fields that have growth potential. The academic deans are engaged in very detailed planning processes that test the assumptions of the models and plan the actual launch timetables for the new and revised programs. 39 CAS: Sample Model for Strategic Program Growth (Additions to Base Enrollments) Contribution to Enrollment Growth 1400 1200 1000 Health Professns International Aff Early Childhood Psych/ Behavioral Sciences Retention Imprv Other CAS Majors 800 600 400 200 0 Base F14 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

Year 5 40 NHP: Sample Model for Strategic Program Growth (Additions to Base Enrollments) Contribution to Enrollment Growth 600 500 400 OTM MSN Prelicensure OTA-to-Mjrs Tracks RN-BSN NHP Base 300 200 100 0 Base F14 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 41 EDU: Sample Model for Strategic Program Growth (Additions to Base Enrollments) Contribution to Enrollment Growth 700 600 500 Ed Policy Ed Administration CACREP Cnsling Early Childhd EDU BASE 400 300 200 100 0 Base F14 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 42 SPS: Sample Model for Strategic Program Growth (Additions to Base Enrollments) Contribution to Enrollment Growth 800 700 600 500 Media Studies Psych/HumRel Early Chldhd Ed Bsns Tracks SPS BASE 400 300 200 100 0 Base F14

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 43 BGS: Sample Model for Strategic Program Growth (Additions to Base Enrollments) Contribution to Enrollment Growth 600 500 400 Other Revise MA STRAT COM MBA Revise BGS BASE 300 200 100 0 Base F14 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 44 Strategic Goal 2: Finances The following slides include the strategic financial ratios that are the basis for Trinitys financial plan 45 Trinity -- Primary Reserve Ratio 2.00 1.00 0.00 Ratio 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 -1.00 -2.00 -3.00 Fiscal Year Measures how long the institution could operate on expendable net assets without relying on additional net assets generated by operations. A primary reserve ratio of .40x would represent moderate financial health. 46 Viability Ratio measures the availability of expendable net assets to cover debt should the institution need to settle its obligations as of the balance sheet date. A ratio of 1.0 or > indicates that an institution has enough expendable net assets to cover its debt obligations.

Trinity -- Return on Net Assets 30.00% 25.00% 20.00% Ratio 15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.00% 2010 Fiscal Year 2011 2012 2013 2014 Return on Net Assets measures the change in net assets that occurred as a result of the operations of the institution. The Return on Net Assets should be positive and have an improving trend. Trinity -- Annual Operating Margin 20.00% 18.00% 16.00% 14.00% 12.00% Ratio 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00% 2010 Fiscal Year 2011 2012 2013 Annual Operating Margin measures the extent to which current-year internally generated resources have contributed to the overall financing of the institutions operations. The Annual Operating Margin should be positive and have an improving trend. 2014 Trinity -- Composite Financial Index 10.00 9.00 8.00 7.00 6.00 Ratio 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 2010 Fiscal Year 2011 2012 2013 2014

Are resources sufficient and flexible enough to support the mission? Primary Reserve Ratio Are debt resources managed strategically to advance the mission? Viability Ratio Does asset performance and management support the strategic direction? Return on Net Assets Ratio Do operating results indicate the institution is living within available resources? Annual Operating Margin (Net Operating Revenues Ratio) 50 CFI SCORING GUIDE SCALE LEVEL CFI SCORING RANGE ACTION One -1 to 1 Assess viability of institution's survival Two 0 to 2 Three 1 to 3 Four 2 to 4 Five 3 to 5 Six 4 to 6 Seven 5 to 7 Eight 6 to 8 Experiment with new initiatives Nine 7 to 9 Experiment with new initiatives; achieve a robust mission Ten >9 Deploy resources to achieve a robust mission Reengineer the institution Direct resources toward transformation Focus resources to compete 51 Trinity -- Cash Flow to Debt Service Ratio 8.00 7.00 6.00 5.00 Ratio 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00

0.00 2010 Fiscal Year 2011 2012 2013 2014 Measures actual margin of protection for annual debt service payments from annual operations. Agreement requires that Trinity maintain a minimum ratio of 1.10:1.00 for fiscal years ending June 30, 2014 through June 30, 2016, and 1.25:1.00 thereafter. Trinity -- Unencumbered Unrestricted Liquidity $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 Ratio $10,000,000 $5,000,000 Fiscal Year $0 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Agreement requires Trinity maintain a minimum balance of unrestricted cash of $11,0000,000, as of the end of the second and fourth fiscal quarters for fiscal years ending June 30, 2014 through June 30, 2016, and $15,000,000 thereafter. Unrestricted cash represents reserves that are available for any purpose immediately. Results Highly capitalized. Financially flexible. Is living within available resources. In a position to deploy resources to achieve a robust mission. University meets debt covenants. 54 Additional data sets and assessments supporting the strategic goals are located in the annual departmental reports available on the Trinity Self-Study website. 55

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