SOAPSTone - Weebly

SOAPSTone - Weebly

SOAPSTone Speaker Occasion Audience Purpose Subject Tone SOAPSTone Speaker The voice that tells the story.

Before authors begin to write, they must decide whose voice is going to be heard. Whether this voice belongs to a fictional character or to the writers themselves, effective writers determine how to insert and develop those attributes of the speaker that will influence the perceived meaning of the piece. SOAPSTone Occasion The time and the place of the piece; the context that prompted the writing.

Writing does not occur in a vacuum. All writers are influenced by the larger occasion: an environment of ideas, attitudes, and emotions that swirl around a broad issue. Then there is the immediate occasion: an event or situation that catches the writer's attention and triggers a response. SOAPSTone Audience The group of readers to whom this piece is directed. Before authors begin to write, they must determine who the audience

is that they intend to address. It may be one person or a specific group. This choice of audience will affect how and why authors write a particular text. SOAPSTone Purpose The reason behind the text. Writers need to consider the purpose of the text in order to develop the thesis or the argument and its logic. They ask themselves, "What do I want my audience to think or do

as a result of reading my text?" SOAPSTone Subject The central topic. Before authors begin to write, they must decide whose voice is going to be heard. Whether this voice belongs to a fictional character or to the writers themselves, effective writers determine how to insert and develop those attributes of the speaker that will influence the perceived meaning of the piece.

SOAPSTone Tone The attitude of the author. The spoken word can convey the speaker's attitude and thus help to impart meaning through tone of voice. With the written word, it is tone that extends meaning beyond the literal, and authors must convey this tone in their: diction (choice of words) syntax (sentence construction) imagery (metaphors, similes, and other types of figurative

language). The ability to manage tone is one of the best indicators of a sophisticated writer. SOAPSTone Tone Tone is the authors/narrators attitude toward the subject. Tone is different from mood, which is the emotional feeling produced by the passage. The tone and the mood of a passage may indeed be the same, but you

need to explain how an author develops a certain tone using the devices of language, such as DIDLS Diction, Imagery, Detail, Language, and Syntax DIDLS TONE IS LARGELY CREATED THROUGH THE USE OF Diction Imagery Details Language

Syntax DIDLS Diction The writers word choices, especially with regard to their correctness, clarity, or effectiveness. You should be able to describe an authors diction (for example, formal or informal, ornate or plain) and understand the ways in which diction can complement the authors purpose. Diction, combined with syntax, figurative language, literary devices, etc., creates an authors style.

DIDLS Imagery Language that appeals to the senses. He fell down like an old tree falling down in a storm. The taste of that first defeat was bitter indeed. He felt like the flowers were waving him a hello. The eery silence was shattered by her scream. After that first sale, his cash register never stopped ringing. The sky looked like the untouched canvas of an artist. He could hear his world crashing down when he heard the news about

her. The F-16 swooped down like an eagle after its prey. The word spread like leaves in a storm. DIDLS Details Specifically described items placed in a work for effect and meaning. The details often define the tone of a text. DIDLS

Language & Rhetorical Devices Figurative Language is a huge umbrella term. Its far easier to list examples of Literal Language than try to explain the vastness that is figurative. Literal language says exactly what it means. Directions and instructions are literal. So is analysis, including the rhetorical variety. Pretty much everything else is figurative including alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, allusion, irony, etc. DIDLS Syntax

The grammatical relationship of words to each other. Sentence Patterns & Variations, Schemes the way an author puts things together. In terms of coding, the syntax is of utmost importance http://englishscholar.com takes you to this site. http//:gets you the dreaded 404 Error message. The placement & arrangement of words has great impact on the tone. Fragments, run-ons and other problematic sentence structures distract from the substance of the text. Relying too heavily on overlysimplistic (single subject/predicate) sentences is usually uninteresting and lacks style.

DIDLS Syntax The grammatical relationship of words to each other. The stage of syntactic analysis is the best understood stage of natural language processing. Syntax helps us understand how words are grouped together to make complex sentences, and gives us a starting point for working out the meaning of the whole sentence. For example, consider the following two sentences: He was a good kisser. "His kiss was as light as meringue, as gentle as the opening notes of Moonlight Sonata, and as nourishing as the first rain of spring after an

endless winter drought." DIDLS Syntax The grammatical relationship of words to each other. For example, the sentence ``John saw Mary with a telescope' there are two different readings based on the following groupings: Did John see Mary through a telescope or did he see Mary with a telescope? When there are many possible groupings then the sentence is syntactically ambiguous. Sometimes we will be able to use general knowledge to work out which is the intended grouping - for example, consider the following sentence:

I saw the Wilson bridge flying into Washington. We can probably guess that the Wilson bridge isn't flying! So, this sentence is syntactically ambiguous, but unambiguous if we bring to bear general knowledge about bridges. The ``John saw Mary ..'' example is more seriously ambiguous, though we may be able to work out the right reading if we know something about John and Mary (is John in the habit of looking at girls through a telescope?).

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