Welcome Organised by Professor John Handley Director Centre

Welcome Organised by Professor John Handley Director Centre

Welcome Organised by Professor John Handley Director Centre for Urban and Regional Ecology, University of Manchester Organised by Jon Lovell Sustainable Development Manager

North West Regional Assembly Organised by Green and pleasant land? Jon Lovell - NWRA GI for a sustainable region

A setting for economic investment Increasing property and land values Reinforce sense of place, attract and retain people A focus for social inclusion Protect and connect natural systems

Reverse habitat fragmentation and increase biodiversity Enhance built heritage Provide the essential contact between people and nature Environmental Economy Landscape and natural environment services - 365m Environmental tourism - 770m Land based industries - 215m 1.35bn Natural Economy Northwest

building a credible brand for the region Regional Spatial Strategy Purpose (statutory) Policy EM3 plans, strategies proposals and schemes should Overcome GI deficits Integrate GI into new development Lets be clear about Regional Parks Consultation and EiP

North West Green Infrastructure Guide Hearts and minds Articulating the concept Putting policy into practice Celebration of regional achievements Process and outcomes Capturing intelligence today and beyond Wide regional awareness and input Local authority and sub-regional responses

A healthy life support system for the region a network of natural environmental components and greenspaces that lies within and between the North Wests cities, towns and villages which provides multiple social, economic and environmental benefits. Thank you [email protected] Colin Maddison Regional Director The Countryside Agency

Organised by working towards Natural England for people places and nature Going Natural Green Infrastructure and the development of Natural England in the NW

Purpose of this presentation. A brief update on the development of Natural England. An overview of the contribution of the Countryside Agencys programme for the Countryside in and Around Towns to developing the Green Infrastructure agenda in the NW over the last 18 months. working towards Natural England for people places and nature

Natural England Established by the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006. Bringing together into one new Non Departmental Public Body the existing English Nature. Most of the Rural Development Service. The Landscape, Access and Recreation Division of the Countryside Agency. Will become fully operational 2nd October 2006.

working towards Natural England for people places and nature Natural England Purpose Given by the NERC Act To ensure that the natural environment is conserved, enhanced, and managed for the benefit of present and future generations, thereby contributing to sustainable development. Urban Rural Coastal Marine. working towards Natural England

for people places and nature Structure Five Directorates Operations (including regions) External Affairs. Strategy and Performance. Science, Evidence and Policy. Finance and corporate services. working towards Natural England for people places and nature

Regions. Regional structures will include Advocacy and Partnerships Team. Area Teams. Business Services Team. Detail yet to be agreed. working towards Natural England for people places and nature Natural England Overall Aim

Natural England will conserve and enhance the natural environment for its intrinsic value, the wellbeing and enjoyment of people and the economic prosperity it can bring. To achieve this Natural England has defined four strategic outcomes. working towards Natural England for people places and nature 1. A Healthy Natural Environment.

Conserving and enhancing landscape, biodiversity, geology, natural resources and heritage. Conservation, recovery and enhancement of the marine environment. working towards Natural England for people places and nature 2. Enjoyment of the natural environment.

Increasing diversity and frequency of people enjoying the natural environment. Increasing understanding of and action for the natural environment. Improving places to enjoy the natural environment. working towards Natural England for people places and nature 3. Sustainable use of the natural

environment. Improving the quality of land and sea management. Environmentally sustainable faming, fishing and forestry. Influencing markets and supply chains to adopt more sustainable practices. Securing commitment to natural environmental goals in policies and strategies. Increase investment in environmental enhancement. working towards Natural England

for people places and nature 4. A secure environmental future. Engaging in debate about what our future natural environment should be like. Climate change adaptation activities. Identification of future threats to the natural environment horizon scanning. Science and evidence activities. working towards Natural England

for people places and nature Where are we now? Legacy activity our starting point. New territory a big remit, bigger than the existing three, especially urban and marine. Strategic Directions Document 2006 2009 about to be issued a framework for how Natural England will develop. Regional plans under development.

working towards Natural England for people places and nature Natural England and Green Infrastructure. Not yet decided on a position. Natural England Board to discuss this month. Growing interest in the Green Infrastructure approach as a means of helping to deliver sustainable development. Close affinity with Natural Englands purpose.

Watch this space! working towards Natural England for people places and nature Legacy work. Countryside Agency support for developing the Green Infrastructure agenda in the NW over the last 2 years through the Countryside in and Around Towns Programme. Successor to Community Forests, Regeneration though

Environmental ACTion programme. Developed a Vision for connecting town and country in the pursuit of sustainable development with Groundwork UK issued 2005. working towards Natural England for people places and nature The Vision. Seeks the development of multifunctional urban fringe and greenspaces.

Set out 10 key functions that represent the spectrum of potential benefits that can be derived from the urban fringe countryside and greenspace. working towards Natural England for people places and nature A Programme in Transition NW CIAT Publication Celebrate what the programme has been doing

over the last 5 to 6 years. Disseminate some of the good practice more widely. Say thank you to those who have been involved. Set the scene for this area of work going into Natural England. working towards Natural England for people places and nature Focus of Recent activity.

Supporting the development of networks and structures to develop the Green Infrastructure agenda in the NW. Policy development and advocacy. Project based development of a Green Infrastructure Planning Approach St Helens Project. working towards Natural England for people places and nature

Why do green infrastructure planning? Green infrastructure planning seeks to answer one overall question. How can the natural environment be conserved, improved and sustainably utilised to contribute to the delivery of regional social, economic and environmental objectives. working towards Natural England for people places and nature

Green Infrastructure Approach is . A means of integrating social, economic and environmental agendas. A means of promoting sustainable development. An evidence based approach to designing intervention in the natural environmental system. working towards Natural England for people places and nature

What are the basic steps? The approach is about answering five key questions What green infrastructure is there? What functions does it perform and what could it do? Where does it need to be maintained? How does it need to change? What needs to be done to secure change? working towards Natural England

for people places and nature Green Infrastructure in the NW. An agenda that has developed rapidly urban focus? RSS Policy seeks to pave the way for a broadly agreed approach to Green Infrastructure Planning that draws in all related sectors. The NW Guide is an opportunity to further shape the way ahead. It is still a developing approach no one best

way. working towards Natural England for people places and nature What support is already there? There is A NW Green Infrastructure Unit. A NW Green Infrastructure Think Tank. A NW Green Infrastructure website. www.greeninfrastructurenw.co.uk A NW Framework of policy support for Green

Infrastructure RES, RRDF, RSS. Lots of activity out there across the region. working towards Natural England for people places and nature But what support is needed? ?????? How should the region develop its Green Infrastructure agenda? Guide consultation. What support will be needed to aid this? Workshop 3.

working towards Natural England for people places and nature The statutory nice view to end with! working towards Natural England for people places and nature Brenda Fullard Senior Public Health Specialist

Government Office for the North West Organised by Health and Spatial Planning Brenda Fullard Government Office for the North West Green-space and mental health: importance of spatial planning

reduction of stress and restoration of attention fatigue increased independence, locus of control and opportunities to succeed in children Creative play; access to the natural world personal growth of adults/enhancing quality of life reduction in noise pollution encouragement and promotion of social cohesion and social capital

opportunities for social interaction, leisure activities and local empowerment Green-space and physical health: importance of spatial planning

improvement in air quality promoting (more) physical activity reducing obesity increase in locally grown foods five a day healthy development of children reducing health inequalities - accessibility to green spaces for all positive association between health and green space more predominant among disadvantaged socioeconomic groups

National Health Policy Department of Health White Paper Choosing Health: Making healthier choices easier. 2005 Create an Environment for Heathier Lifestyles Extend concern for health to all sectors of society Integrate health into all aspects of regional policy

Small Change, Big Difference Campaign educating people on the long term health benefits of making small changes in their day to day lives Other Reports: Wanless, Acheson, Tackling Health Inequalities Regional Spatial Strategy Reducing health inequalities Creating an environment supportive of good health Equitable access to good quality services

Reference to health in all aspects of strategy Further examination of implications of changing demography and social geography of region Ageing Demographic trends in particular localities Ethnic composition HIA and the Planning Process Possibilities to integrate HIA into the spatial planning process Incorporate HIA into Environmental Impact

Assessment (EIA) Incorporate appropriate health objectives into Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Incorporate appropriate health objectives into Sustainability Appraisal (SA) Develop policy and tools to identify when an independent HIA needs to be undertaken Other Issues Need for Health Impact Assessment of local spatial plans

Importance of partnerships health care and Local Authorities, local community groups and private sector Better collaborative working, knowledge and understanding between health and spatial planners Mapping and the North West Public Health Observatory

Local authority health profiles health of people in each local authority updated annually Thirty indicators including air quality, road injuries and deaths , obesity levels demonstrate where action can be taken to improve peoples health and reduce health inequalities www.communityhealthprofiles.info/index.php North West Public Health Observatory

Where Wealth means Health Compared to the residents of the wealthiest areas in the region (top 20%), those living in the poorest 20% are: Three times more likely to be admitted to hospital for mental health conditions Five times more likely to suffer alcohol related conditions requiring hospital admission More than twice as likely to suffer from heart conditions or asthma Over two times more likely to die from either smoking or alcohol

related conditions. www.nwpho.org.uk/documents References National Institute for Mental Health in England. Making it Possible: Improving mental health and wellbeing in England. CSIP October 2005 National Heart Forum. Lightening the Load: tackling overweight and obesity.

2006 Department of Health. Choosing Health: Making healthier choices easier. 2005 Brenda Fullard Public Health Team Government Office for the North West City Tower Manchester [email protected] www.nwph.net

Francis Hesketh Partner TEP Organised by Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Green Infrastructure A Private Sector Perspective

Francis Hesketh Partner TEP July 10th 2006 Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives 1. Scope (and limits) of development-led GI Investment 2. GI, Land Values, Abnormals and Return on Capital 3. Do developers view GI as a positive thing?

4. Scope for Negotiating Better GI thro development 5. Making GI straightforward for developers Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Northwest 80% Rural 20% Urban Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Northwest

<2% switch From Rural to Urban over 25 year period Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives 25 year transformation of land into urban uses as a % of

total land cover NB Map precedes Growth Area agenda, but unlikely to significantly change % for NW Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Zone of greatest change is 2% greenfield, 2-3% urban

Northwest 70%+ re-use of urban land for developmen t Will include dev of urban open spaces, DUN land

densificati on Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Northwest Densification, Population uplift Mobility & Accessibility aspirations Ageing

Demographics Will place pressures on urban and rural greenspac es Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Liv & Mcr

City Regions 45% urban (by 2016) Although rate of developmen t > NW; still relatively small total land affected

Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives 1. Rate of English residential development was 6,000ha per annum in early 1990s, dropping back to 4,800ha/yr in early 2000s. 2. Assume faster development rates of 7,000ha per annum in future (Growth Areas etc) 3. Assume ca 25% of each development is open space (planned POS, undevelopable

areas etc new GI directly associated with development will be ca 1800ha 4. If s106 type contributions could average 50K/ha for GI; this might generate 350m per annum for GI in the wider area Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Development can be a significant but localised driver of landscape change Market forces give significant uplift in land values but developers face an increasing

number of EO costs. Brownfield de-contamination (not always merited?) Infrastructure (roads, schools, traffic measures, neighbourhood facilities) Affordable Housing %ages rising Structural Open space (Green Infrastructure) Green Travel Plans Sustainable / Renewable Construction methods Disability Provision Miscellaneous site-specific matters e.g. art, security, covenants

Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Land Value, Return on Capital & Land Options Land Values are often the biggest items on development companies Assets register (the books). Generally its in the interests of developers to keep the book value of land high, so they will try to minimise abnormals. Land is usually held on option with landowner, with the option exercised on grant of planning permission some abnormals can usually be deducted from purchase price but landowners will resist reductions

Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Land Value, Return on Capital & Land Options Developers are measured by Return on Capital thus it is in developers interests to have a high number of plots on the books and to bring forward plots to construction as quickly as possible a slow progress on plots reduces return on capital. Having to make unplanned reductions in plot numbers to accommodate GI will be particularly tough places developer in difficult position with landowner NB

nature of contracts between owners and developers Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Developers Views of Green Infrastructure Developers vary greatly but major developers have a broadly positive view; Positives Developers are human tend to want to leave behind a good environment GI improves saleability hence return on capital GI helps with other standards that are coming into force

BREEAM etc GI demonstrates corporate responsibility important when tendering for major surplus public sector land e.g. EP Hospital sites Good PR / Feelgood factor Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Developers Views of Green Infrastructure Negatives Scepticism over long-term management by Local Authorities GI is often one of many competing demands on land value

sometimes the need is not apparent GI mustnt be seen as a wish list by a Local authority to get for something it should be doing anyway Inconsistent or incoherent application of GI standards by Local Authorities GI that doesnt have a human aspect is less attractive to developers as incoming residents may not appreciate the value of it e.g. distant greenspaces, publicly-inaccessible nature reserves. Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives

Green Infrastructure Strategies Important for Local Authorities to communicate the importance and functions of GI to developers Important for a site or neighbourhood-specific strategy to be articulated Conservation of existing assets that may be put under increased pressure from the development e.g. wildlife areas, sports areas, strategic spaces Management of assets to make them attractive to new residents e.g. wardening of nature areas, Cressington Heath woodland / heathland

Restoration of assets that may have become disused or neglected but will be needed e.g. Stamford Brook restoration of Sinderland Brook Creation of new GI both for new and existing residents Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Growth & Change Zones Settled Zones (protect

functions) Create & Extend Settled Zones (Functional Deficit) GI Conserve

& Manage Growth & Change Zones Settled Zones (in Deficit) Regenerate & Enhance

Strategies Growth & Change Zones Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Growth & Change Zones Settled Zones (protect

functions) Create & Extend Settled Zones (Functional Deficit) GI Conserve

& Manage Growth & Change Zones Settled Zones (in Deficit) Regenerate & Enhance

Strategies Growth & Change Zones Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Scope for Negotiating Green Infrastructure

Planning Negotiations can deliver more / better GI than at present S106 obligations are now standard practice on most sites, esp major schemes but more could occur In desirable areas, land values can rise to 2m per acre for residential development (commercial / industrial lower - 500K - 800K per acre) NB Undesirable areas with many abnormals wont

sustain these kind of land values Need for linkage of the GI being secured by the s106 to the impact of the development requires good policy justification if monies are directed to projects a long way from site. Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Scope for Negotiating Green Infrastructure

Ambivalence by developers about simply putting money into a general s106 pot which may not benefit the site itself Need to demonstrate a relationship of the GI to the new residents (e.g. Longsight urban cricket facility) Need for clearly-articulated GI policy / standards /

guidance Human relationships important in negotiating major developers will respond to a well-put case for GI investment Planning Gain Supplement fear that it will reduce scope for site-specific uplift in GI if money ends up being spent on Govt schemes / LAs pet projects Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Making it Easier for Developers to Deliver GI Developers suffering Initiative Overload

EcoHomes / BREEAM Sustainable Construction Renewables obligations / Carbon Loads Secured by Design Disability Discrimination Act Local Plan / Framework standards / SPGs Green Travel Plans Local Labour obligations Gap between aspiration and reality affects deliverability e.g. Oldham 10% renewable obligation

Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Making it Easier for Developers to Deliver GI Danger of GI being too vague a term Need for clearly articulated expectations on what GI is required from individual developments; Within Within Within Within

site neighbourhood Borough / catchment sub-region? BUT need for flexibility in interpretation how local GI need can best be met - one size fits all policies have limitations (x trees per house, x ha open space per 50 dwellings) Bricks & Green Mortar Developers Perspectives Making it Easier for Developers to Deliver GI

Benefits of Delivery Vehicles for GI, especially off-site contributions (Community Forest Trusts, Wildlife Trusts, Parish Councils, Local Authority Teams) Need to build developer confidence and provide positive feedback and publicity arising from off-site contributions. Milton Keynes Roof Tax approach may work on major development schemes with uncomplicated landowning structure need to investigate if transferable to smaller / fragmented developments

Dr Alan Barber Simon Research Fellow University of Manchester Organised by Green Infrastructure in NW GI where quality brings value

Alan Barber [email protected] CABE Space planning, design, management and maintenance of urban parks, public places and greenspace networks Advising and supporting local & public authorities Promoting high quality standards and best practice

Undertaking and diseminating research Campaigns and Advocacy Developing skills Green Infrastructure - where quality brings value CABE space is really influencing the whole of CABEs agenda CABE is developing more into an urban agency Richard Simmons, Chief Executive, CABE

Horticulture Week 8 June 2006 Managing for biodiversity in parks and green spaces means working to improve the ecological qualities of our towns and cities

and to maximise the opportunities for people to experience nature close to hand. Green Infrastructure - where quality brings value We also need to promote the idea of the ecologically sensitive city in which humans recognise that they cohabit with nature. Trees, woodland and other open space are all important

in fostering biodiversity, in enhancing human health and well-being, and in reducing noise and pollution Towards an Urban Renaissance Report of the Urban Task Force 1999 Green Infrastructure - where quality brings value Green Infrastructure: embraces all types of green spaces as a single managed entity

Implies an overview of all green spaces regardless of ownership Prompts useful parallels with transport, drainage and other infrastructure Provides a structural dimension to tree cover and surface water bodies Demands a comprehensive skills base Helps question the rationale of poor spaces Single Multifunctional greenspace advantages

12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Aids Marketing

Raises Political Profile Engenders Attracts Public Resources Support Achieves Goals

Green Future 2005 Employment of professional staff 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

Green Future 2005 Green Infrastructure - where quality brings value The land is cheap; it is the benefits which add value - beyond its borders! GI benefits are usually grouped under economic, social and environmental Ultimately all GI benefits contribute to the economy Most GI benefits rise with quality

Where quality is low, more investment will raise quality to provide better value Promenade Plantee, Paris Lombard Street, San Francisco S 106 Amenity Area, Nailsea Gainsborough Square, Bristol

Square du Temple, Paris Duck Pond, North Yorkshire Alexandra Park, Oldham Manchester City FC, Carrington Lane Jubilee Park, Middleton PPS:15 Planning & Flood Prevention

8.34 incorporating existing watercourses into the open space requirements for new residential development will be preferred to locating them to the rear of properties or culverting them. Where it is necessary to achieve a quality design solution to a development problem the diversion of a watercourse will be acceptable on planning grounds where it keeps the watercourse open and it is demonstrated that it will not adversely affect the drainage of the area.

PPG:17 Open Space, Sport & Recreation Needs Assessment Audit of Facilities Set Local Standards for: Quantity Quality Accessibility But what about Diversity?

Queens Drive, Liverpool Apex House, Reading Multifunctionality - CLERE Model As an agent for Community development and education As Landscape to be conserved As an Ecosystem

providing urban services As a Recreational resource for health and well-being As a contributor to the local Economy www.green-space.org.uk/library/greenfuture.htm Bushy Park, London Workshops

1. Functionality mapping, The Barn 2. Quality greenspace and design, Stables 1 3. Promoting multifunctional benefits, Stables 2 4. Planning the GI agenda, Stables 3 Organised by Tom Ferguson Development Plans Manager St Helens Council

Organised by Green Infrastructure A Local Authority Perspective St Helens Tom Ferguson, Development Plans Manager St Helens Council www.visitsthelens.gov.uk INTRODUCTION

Economic development, planning and the environment in St Helens. Countryside In and Around Towns (CIAT) St Helens Pilot Study. Observations on green infrastructure from this local perspective. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk ST HELENS CONTEXT 50 % Borough area is countryside / Urban Fringe / CIAT

/ Greenbelt. Objective 1 Area. 36th most deprived authority in England. Community Plan aim to make St Helens a modern, distinctive, economically prosperous and vibrant borough. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk ST HELENS CONTEXT

(continued) Importance of economic regeneration. First Economic Strategy in 1986 need for strategic landscape review. Groundwork Trust and Wasteland to Woodland over 300 Ha of derelict land transferred. New Landscape issue is how best to use this new resource. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk

CITY GROWTH STRATEGY Latest Economic Strategy published in 2003. Pilot project (1 of 4 areas in England). Private sector led partnership. Wealth creation from within. Physical transformation one of four themes. Town in the Forest. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk COUNTRYSIDE IN AND AROUND

TOWNS Countryside Agency Pilot Project. Development of GIS Database. To understand multifunctionality. Help to match need and opportunity. Landscape Character Assessment www.visitsthelens.gov.uk COUNTRYSIDE IN AND AROUND TOWNS

(CONTINUED) Plethora of existing and evolving studies including Town in the Forest Woodland Strategy. Greenspace Strategy. Integration with LDF and LSP. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk LOCAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

Spatial Planning. Regional Spatial Strategy Part of the Development Plan. RSS Policy EM3. Action Plans. CIAT Project and St Helens approach. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk LOCAL STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP Targeted four of the ten Countryside Agency functions :

Regeneration Recreation Health Education Selective consultation included : PCT (Planning / Health Liaison Group) Education Advisors Management Meeting Investment Action Group www.visitsthelens.gov.uk

LOCAL STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP (Continued) Linked CIAT Project to City Growth Strategy and Woodland Strategy. St Helens Forest. Presentation to LSP Board. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk FUTURE ACTIONS

Continuation and extension of CIAT Steering Group to include LSP representatives. Take forward recommendations of CIAT including St Helens Forest. School use of the database. Linking health agenda to greenspace. Build Green Infrastructure into LDF Core Strategy. Undertake study of Rural Landowners (Agricultural Economy) using Local Enterprise Growth Initiative funding. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk

OBSERVATIONS Evolving process. Comprehensive framework - can it unite doorstep concerns of Local Area Agreement and Sub-Regional Community Forest or Regional Parks? Opportunity of spatial expression through planning system. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk OBSERVATIONS

Importance of information and its maintenance. Link to existing agendas and priorities. Value of existing partnership arrangements in particular Mersey Forest. www.visitsthelens.gov.uk Richard Tracey Land Regeneration Manager Northwest Regional Development Agency

Organised by Richard Tracey Land Regeneration Manager RES 2006 113. Develop the economic benefits of the regions natural economy through better

alignment of environmental activities and economic gain: . and develop a strategy for Green Infrastructure Process Start here

Consultation What difference does it make? Thank you for attending this seminar. Have a safe journey home. Please hand in your delegate satisfaction questionnaire and badge before you leave. www.merseyforest.org.uk Organised by

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