TOK essay building: Groupwork exercise You'll be working

TOK essay building: Groupwork exercise You'll be working

TOK essay building: Groupwork exercise You'll be working in groups with one of last year's essay titles. During this exercise, I'll familiarise you with one way of approaching the production of a TOK essay. Step 1: Choosing a title Consider all the titles carefully before choosing: read and discuss each one in your group before moving onto step 2. Discuss each essay title in turn, and don't dismiss any of the

titles until you've discussed them all. When you've chosen your title, write it down. Step 2: Recognising key words/concepts What key concepts does the title invoke?

Make a list of the important words/concepts in the title Are all these concepts clear and unambiguous, or are some of them open to different interpretations? Will any of the concepts need unpacking in the essay? Step 3: Recognising the main KQ

The title may make the KQ very clear, but it may not. Either way, it is always worth putting the main KQ into your own words. What does the title ask about the process of gaining/ evaluating/using knowledge? Step 4: Recognising related KQs What other KQs do you think will need to be addressed when responding to the main KQ that you recognised in the last

step? Make a list of as many related KQs as possible When you've done this, put them in order of importance, from most central to least Step 5: Considering different stances that can be taken Make a list of all the possible stances that you could take in response to the KQ that you recognised in step 3.

Step 6: Arguing each stance For each of the possible stances that you have listed, collect arguments in favour of that stance. How can I justify this stance? What are the strengths and weaknesses of each argument? Step 7: Choosing your stance

Now that you have recognised possible stances that could be taken, and listed possible arguments, you should choose the stance that you wish to take in your essay. Which arguments are the most convincing? Step 8a: Selecting your main arguments AND counter-arguments Rearrange the notes you took for step 6 to help you compile two lists:

One list of the arguments that you will use to help you justify the stance you are taking Another list of counter-arguments (i.e. the lists of arguments you just compiled for different possible responses to the title) Step 8b: Assumption checking Critically evaluate the arguments you have just compiled, and ask, for each one, the following questions:

Does the argument rely on an assumption that needs to be justified? (The classic example of this is saying something like there can be no such thing as artistic knowledge, and using, as an argument, the fact that art is entirely subjective, which of course is merely an assumption that needs to be justified.) How can I justify that assumption? Step 9: Reconciling conflicts

Having recognised counter-arguments now leaves you with a potential problem: How will you justify your dismissal of the counterarguments? Can you provide convincing reasons? Can you provide statistics/evidence? Will recognising differences between AOKs/WOKs solve the problem? Can you specify the definitions of key terms in order to reconcile the conflicts?

etc. Step 10: Planning your approach to the essay Now you need to consider how you will approach the arguing of your stance: Will you respond to the question in the context of a couple of Areas of Knowledge? If so, which ones? Will you instead look at Ways of Knowing? Why? Would it be better to respond by examining a central

TOK concept, such as truth or evidence? Step 11: Gathering examples Make a list of possible examples that could be used to illustrate the arguments in your essay. How does each example illustrate your point? Are the examples real and specific (rather than made up, vague and hypothetical)? Are they original and interesting?

Are some of the examples from your own personal experience (e.g. IB subject lessons)? Is there variety in the kind of examples you have? Step 12: Writing Now you're ready to start writing. The groundwork you've laid during these preparatory stages should make life a lot easier for you.

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • PLACENTA: Specifications Lid & connection to fetus Bowl

    PLACENTA: Specifications Lid & connection to fetus Bowl

    VILLUS. Do I know you? ARACHNOID VILLUS PLACENTAL CHORIONIC VILLUS + sub-types SMALL INTESTINAL VILLUS JOINT SYNOVIAL VILLUS PLACENTA: Specifications Bowl for blood Lid & connection to fetus Huge exchange surface Pump to move blood thru bowl Decidua Basal plate...
  • EAL Nexus Resource Mother, any distance by Simon

    EAL Nexus Resource Mother, any distance by Simon

    Mother, any distance by Simon Armitage: Flashcards. Subject: English. Age group: KS4. Topic: Poetry. a living room. a pelmet. a window. a wall. a floor. a door. a single span (one hand span) a spool of tape (a measuring tape)...
  • Hydrogen H H2 Nitrogen N N2 Oxygen 0 O2 Fluorine F F2

    Hydrogen H H2 Nitrogen N N2 Oxygen 0 O2 Fluorine F F2

    Hydrogen H H2 Nitrogen N N2 Oxygen O O2 Fluorine F F2 Chlorine Cl Cl2 Bromine Br Br2 Iodine I I2 hydrogen + oxygen water H2 + O2 H2O hydrogen + oxygen water 2H2 + O2 2 H2O Carbon +...
  • Hydrologic Moeling System

    Hydrologic Moeling System

    HYDROLOGIC MOELING SYSTEM HEC-HMS Hydrologic Modeling Event or Continuous Lumped or Distributed A Distributed Model is one in which the spatial (geographic) variations of characteristics and processes are considered explicitly.
  • Millennium Development Goals - University of Pittsburgh

    Millennium Development Goals - University of Pittsburgh

    The Millennium Development Goals Linkages with Child Health The Challenge in India Dr. KANUPRIYA CHATURVEDI Dr .S.K CHATURVEDI Millennium Development Goals In the United Nations Millennium Summit in 2000, 147 countries adopted MDGs Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger by half...
  • Engineering Mathematics - Shades of Blue

    Engineering Mathematics - Shades of Blue

    Algebra - Ancient Babylonians and Egyptians were using algebra by 1,800 B.C. Geometry - Egypt, China, and India by 300 B.C. Trigonometry - by 200 B.C. Calculus and Differential Equations - by the 1,600's
  • Working with Conflict NHA Leadership Institute 2019 Jonathan

    Working with Conflict NHA Leadership Institute 2019 Jonathan

    Define conflict in the workplace. Anticipate potential outcomes resulting from conflict. Identify contributing factors and types of conflict in the workplace. Recognize personal style/approach to situations involving conflict. Compare and contrast various strategies for conflict. Examine strategies for conflict resolution.
  • Medical Mycology - University of Windsor

    Medical Mycology - University of Windsor

    When the teleomorph is discovered, the technically correct name for the fungus is that of the teleomorph. The large majority of these fungi are terrestrial, and are either saprophytes or parasites of plants relatively few are parasites of animals Asexual...