Chapter 1 College Expectations: Being a Critical Thinker

Chapter 1 College Expectations: Being a Critical Thinker

Chapter 1 College Expectations: Being a Critical Thinker Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|1 Chapter Questions Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|2

Tyler Olson/shutterstock.com Youve Made the Right Decision! Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|3 Benefits of an Education Career opportunities Mental and physical health Armadilo Stock/shutterstock.com

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Social and financial benefits 1|4 Education and Mental Health More education is associated with less mental illness Sironi (2012)

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|5 Higher Civic Engagement Baum, Ma, and Payea (2010) Volunteering 50 45 40 35 30 25

20 15 10 5 0 Volunteering High School Diploma Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. College Degree 1|6

More EducationHigher Salaries Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|7 More EducationHigher Salaries Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|8 Unfortunately, Not All Students Are Graduating

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1|9 Why are some students successful and others are not? Ability Accessing help Motivation

Good Decision Making Time Management Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Goal Setting Resilient Factors

Study Strategies Note-Taking Test- Taking 1 | 10 Freshman Seminar Courses Contribute to Success! Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 11

Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Faculty Expectations Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 12 The Syllabus Tyler Olson/shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 13

Promoting a Learning Focused Environment Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 14 Investigating Cell Phone Ringing in a Classroom Setting End, Worthman, Mathews, and Wetterau (2010) 71 Students (23 Males; 48 Females)

Outcome Measures Note Quality Test Performance Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 15 Results Cell Phone Group: Missed information Ldprod/shutterstock.com

Performed worse on test items End, Worthman, Mathews, and Wetterau (2010) Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 16 Results Task No Cell Phone Cell Phone

Item #1 94.9% 68.8% Item #2 79.5% 50.0% Item #1

79.5% 53.1% Item #2 82.1% 43.8% Correct Answers Important Information in Notes End, Worthman, Mathews, and Wetterau (2010)

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 17 E-mailing Your Professor Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 18 What is Academic Integrity? argus/Shutterstock.com

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 19 Academic Integrity Quiz A student sees the following sentence in a source: Paraphrasing is a skill, requiring you to capture the idea of another person in your own words. This student changes the sentence to this one: Paraphrasing is a talent that requires you to capture the idea of another individual in your own words Raj creates a PowerPoint presentation and uses some photos. He doesnt cite them because they were readily available on the Internet. Sam has just taken a psychology test. His friend Alex is in

another section of psychology and has not yet taken the test. Sam says to Alex "Wowthat was a difficult exambe sure you really study the developmental theorists". Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 20 What is Plagiarism? Putting your name on the work (entire paper or small sections) that someone else created

Not using quotation marks when using another persons words Using quotation marks when using another persons words, but not citing the source Changing a few words in the sentence and citing the source Paraphrasing the idea of another person and not citing the source

Submitting the same paper or work in two different classes without professor approval (Raimes and Jerskey, 2011; Roig, 2013) Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 21 No Need to Cite Sources When: Its completely your own idea Its common

knowledge ra2studio/shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 22 Paraphrasing Paraphrasing is a skill, requiring you to capture the idea of another person in your own words and involves much more than simply

changing a few words in a sentence. Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 23 What is Cheating? Engaging in any activity that gives you or another student an unfair advantage Using unapproved materials or resources Working collaboratively on independent

assignments Talking with another student about the exam you just took Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 24 Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Critical Thinking Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 25

Defining Critical Thinking Critical thinking has been defined as the ability to think in a sophisticated mannerto ask questions, define terms, examine evidence, analyze assumptions, avoid emotional reasoning, resist oversimplification, consider alternative interpretations, and tolerate uncertainty (Wade, 2008,11). Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 26 Intellectual Development

Perry; West Absolute Right or wrong Personal Opinions matter Rules Based Use rules to judge claims Evaluative Formal strategies Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 27

Blooms Taxonomy Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 28 The Process of Becoming a Critical Thinker Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 29 wavebreakmedia/shutterstock.com

Active Reading Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 30 The 3R Method Read Recite Review Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

1 | 31 Exploring the Research McDaniel, Howard, & Einstein (2009) Research Question: Which reading strategy works best? Re-reading Note-taking 3R Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Tom Peterson, Middlesex County College 1 | 32 The Study McDaniel, Howard, & Einstein (2009) 72 College Students were randomly assigned to groups Re-read (read the passage twice)

Note-taking (take notes while reading, but no notes allowed during testing) Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Test Scores 3R Read-Recite-Review (read passage once, recite what you remember, read passage again)

1 | 33 The Results! McDaniel, Howard, & Einstein (2009) Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 34 The So What Factor! Using the 3R technique will not add significantly to study time, but will

likely lead to more positive academic outcomes Consider both verbal and written methods for step 2Recite Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Filipe Frazao/shutterstock.com 1 | 35 SQ3R Survey Question

Read Recite Review Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 36 Highlighting Read WITHOUT highlighting first Limit highlighting to 1-2 sentences per paragraph or section Combine highlighting with

other active reading methods Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. wavebreakmedia/shutterstock.com 1 | 37 Note-taking While Reading CLOSE the BOOK And then Take Notes! Write page numbers

for easy reference back to the text Diego Cervo/shutterstock.com Integrate reading and lecture notes Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 38 Build Background Knowledge Read Chapter Summaries and Table of Contents

Christos Georghiou/shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Make connections to information previously learned 1 | 39 Recht and Leslie (1988) David Lee/shutterstock.com

High Baseball Knowledge Low Baseball Knowledge Good reader 31.4 18.8 Poor Reader 27.5

13.9 Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 40 photogl/shutterstock.com Peer-Reviewed Research Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 41 What are Peer Reviewed

Journal Articles? Theoretical or research written work that has been deemed worthy of publication by professionals in the field Login/Shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 42 The Peer Reviewed Process

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 43 Why learn about peer reviewed research? Victor Correia/Shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Very Scholarly Source Already Evaluated by Peers

Meet College Level Expectations Impress your Professors! 1 | 44 Elements of a Research Article Abstract Introduction Method Results

Discussion Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 45 Abstract Summary of article Key finding(s) Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 46

Introduction Sets the stage for why this research was conducted Reviews past research Hypothesis (educated guess about results) Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 47 Method

Subjects Who participated in the study? Procedure What did the participants do? How was the study conducted? Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 48 Results

What did they find out? Tables, graphs, and words! Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 49 Make it Meaningful! Filipe Frazao/shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

1 | 50 Discussion Reviews key findings (without the math!) Connects findings to past and future research Application and value of these findings Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

1 | 51 Introduction: Why is this topic important? What question did the researcher seek to answer? Method: Who participated in the study? What did the researchers ask the participants to do? Results: What were the findings? Application: How can you use this information as a So What?

student? What should we do with this information? Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 52 Reading Research Articles Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 53 Reading, Critical Thinking and Information Literacy

Reading What did you do when you didnt know a word? Did you taking notes while reading the article? Thomas M. Perkins/Shutterstock.com Did you extract key ideas and points? Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 54

Reading, Critical Thinking and Information Literacy Critical Thinking How can the results of the study apply to you? How do you know the findings are accurate? What are the limitations of this study? Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Thomas M. Perkins/Shutterstock.com

1 | 55 Reading, Critical Thinking and Information Literacy Information Literacy Where can you find additional evidence? How do you access information? What type of information is available? MARKABOND/Shutterstock.com How do you evaluate

whether the information is credible? Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 56 Exploring the Research Howard, H.E., & Jones, W.P. (2000). Effectiveness of a freshmen seminar in an urban university: Measurement of selected indicators. College Student Journal, 34, 509 515. Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 | 57

The Research Question Howard & Jones (2000) Will students taking a student success course Feel more prepared for college Be more confident Know more about campus resources and study skills Have a stronger commitment to a

college major? Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. argus/shutterstock.com 1 | 58 The Study Howard & Jones (2000) 154 college students taking a Student Success Course Pre-test

Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Took Student Success Course Post-test; GPA 1 | 59 The Results Howard & Jones (2000)

Note: ALL students benefitted! 5 Except with. 4.5 4 3.5 3 2.5 Pre-test Post-test 2

1.5 1 0.5 0 Prepared for College College Major Choice Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Confidence Awareness of Resources Study Skills

1 | 60 Application Howard & Jones (2000) Taking a Student Success Course is Valuable! Filipe Frazao/shutterstock.com Copyright 2016 Harrington Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Career Decision

Making takes time- meet with a Career Counselor to explore options 1 | 61

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