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INTERNATIONALGCSEANTHOLOGYPearson Edexcel International GCSE in English Literature (4ET1)Pearson Edexcel International GCSE in English Language (Specification A) (4EA1)For first teaching September 2016First examination June 2018Issue 2

INTERNATIONAL GCSEEnglish AnthologyIssue 2ANTHOLOGYPearson Edexcel International GCSE English Anthology for use with:Edexcel International GCSE in English Literature (4ET1)Edexcel International GCSE in English Language (Specification A) (4EA1)

Summary of Pearson Edexcel International GCSE EnglishAnthology (9-1) for 4EA1 and 4EB1Issue 2 ChangesPage3071Summary of changes made between previous issueand this current issueLinenumberBright Lights of SarajevoThere have been amendments to the structure of the poem11/12with stanza breaks between lines 11 and 12 and between20/21lines 20 and 21 inserted.Half-Caste“you” amended to “yu”“you” amended to “yu”Link break inserted between lines 30 and 31“yu” amended to “you”62530/3137If you need further information on these changes or what they mean, contact us viaour website at: tml.

Published by Pearson Education Limited, 80 Strand, London, WC2R 0RL.Copies of official specifications for all Edexcel qualifications may be found on the website:qualifications.pearson.com Pearson Education Limited 2016First published 201619 18 17 1610 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1British Library Cataloguing in Publication DataA catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.ISBN 978 1 446 93108 0Copyright noticeAll rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by anymeans (including photocopying or storing it in any medium by electronic means and whetheror not transiently or incidentally to some other use of this publication) without the writtenpermission of the copyright owner, except in accordance with the provisions of theCopyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 or under the terms of a licence issued by theCopyright Licensing Agency, Saffron House, 6–10 Kirby Street, London EC1N 8TS(www.cla.co.uk). Applications for the copyright owner’s written permission should beaddressed to the publisher.

ContentsInternational GCSE English Language (Specification A)Part 1: Paper 1 Section A Non-fiction textsFrom The Danger of a Single Story, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie2From A Passage to Africa, George Alagiah4From The Explorer’s Daughter, Kari Herbert6Explorers or boys messing about? Either way, taxpayer gets rescue bill, Steven Morris 8From 127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place, Aron Ralston10Young and dyslexic? You’ve got it going on, Benjamin Zephaniah12From A Game of Polo with a Headless Goat, Emma Levine14From Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan, Jamie Zeppa17From H is for Hawk, Helen Macdonald20From Chinese Cinderella, Adeline Yen Mah22International GCSE English Language (Specification A)Part 2: Paper 2 Section A Poetry and Prose textsDisabled, Wilfred Owen27"Out, Out ", Robert Frost28An Unknown Girl, Moniza Alvi29The Bright Lights of Sarajevo, Tony Harrison30Still I Rise, Maya Angelou31The Story of an Hour, Kate Chopin32The Necklace, Guy de Maupassant34Significant Cigarettes (from The Road Home), Rose Tremain40Whistle and I’ll Come to You (from The Woman in Black), Susan Hill44Night, Alice Munro46

International GCSE English LiteraturePart 3: Paper 1 Section A PoetryIf , Rudyard Kipling55Prayer Before Birth, Louis MacNeice56Blessing, Imtiaz Dharker57Search For My Tongue, Sujata Bhatt58Half-past Two, U A Fanthorpe60Piano, D H Lawrence61Hide and Seek, Vernon Scannell62Sonnet 116, William Shakespeare63La Belle Dame sans Merci, John Keats64Poem at Thirty-Nine, Alice Walker66War Photographer, Carol Ann Duffy67The Tyger, William Blake68My Last Duchess, Robert Browning69Half-caste, John Agard71Do not go gentle into that good night, Dylan Thomas73Remember, Christina Rossetti74

IntroductionThis anthology has been prepared to support the following specifications: Pearson Edexcel International GCSE (9-1) in English Language (Specification A) Pearson Edexcel International GCSE (9-1) in English Literature.International GCSE (9-1) in English Language (Specification A)Students studying the English Language (Specification A) qualification must study all theEnglish Language non-fiction texts in this anthology in preparation for Paper 1 Section Aof the examination. Students will be asked to analyse an anthology text and compare itto an unseen non-fiction piece. Copies of the anthology must not be taken into theexamination. The anthology text, along with the unseen text, will be printed in anExtracts Booklet, which will accompany the question paper.For both examined and coursework options, students must study all the EnglishLanguage poetry and prose texts in the anthology for Paper 2 (examined) and Paper 3(coursework) of the qualification.Students taking the full examination route will be asked to analyse a poetry or proseanthology text (Paper 2 Section A), which will be printed in the question paper.Students taking the coursework route will be asked to write an analytical essay,exploring a topic of their choice on two poetry or prose anthology texts. This isaccompanied by a short commentary explaining why the student has chosen their texts.Further information is given in the specification, which must be read in conjunction withthis anthology.International GCSE (9-1) in English LiteratureStudents studying the English Literature qualification must study all the EnglishLiterature poems in preparation for Paper 1 Section A of the examination.Students will be asked to compare two anthology poems from a choice of two questions.A booklet containing all the English Literature poems will be provided with theexamination paper.

International GCSE English Language (Specification A)Part 1: Paper 1 Section A Non-fiction textsFrom The Danger of a Single Story, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie2From A Passage to Africa, George Alagiah4From The Explorer’s Daughter, Kari Herbert6Explorers or boys messing about? Either way, taxpayer gets rescue bill, Steven Morris 8From 127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place, Aron Ralston10Young and dyslexic? You’ve got it going on, Benjamin Zephaniah12From A Game of Polo with a Headless Goat, Emma Levine14From Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan, Jamie Zeppa17From H is for Hawk, Helen Macdonald20From Chinese Cinderella, Adeline Yen Mah22Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English AnthologyIssue 2 — December 2017 Pearson Education Limited1

International GCSE English Language (Specification A) – Paper 1 Section A Non-fiction textsFrom The Danger of a Single Story, Chimamanda Ngozi AdichieAdichie, a successful novelist, delivered this speech at a TED conference. Shespeaks about the power of storytelling and the danger of a single view.5I'm a storyteller. And I would like to tell you a few personal stories about what I like tocall “the danger of the single story.” I grew up on a university campus in eastern Nigeria.My mother says that I started reading at the age of two, although I think four isprobably close to the truth. So I was an early reader, and what I read were British andAmerican children's books.10I was also an early writer, and when I began to write, at about the age of seven, storiesin pencil with crayon illustrations that my poor mother was obligated to read, I wroteexactly the kinds of stories I was reading: all my characters were white and blue-eyed,they played in the snow, they ate apples, and they talked a lot about the weather, howlovely it was that the sun had come out.Now, this despite the fact that I lived in Nigeria. I had never been outside Nigeria. Wedidn't have snow, we ate mangoes, and we never talked about the weather, becausethere was no need to. 15202530354045What this demonstrates, I think, is how impressionable and vulnerable we are in the faceof a story, particularly as children. Because all I had read were books in which characterswere foreign, I had become convinced that books by their very nature had to haveforeigners in them and had to be about things with which I could not personally identify.Now, things changed when I discovered African books. There weren't many of themavailable, and they weren't quite as easy to find as the foreign books.But because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye, I went through a mentalshift in my perception of literature. I realized that people like me, girls with skin thecolour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist inliterature. I started to write about things I recognized.Now, I loved those American and British books I read. They stirred my imagination. Theyopened up new worlds for me. But the unintended consequence was that I did not knowthat people like me could exist in literature. So what the discovery of African writers didfor me was this: it saved me from having a single story of what books are.I come from a conventional, middle-class Nigerian family. My father was a professor. Mymother was an administrator. And so we had, as was the norm, live-in domestic help,who would often come from nearby rural villages. So, the year I turned eight, we got anew house boy. His name was Fide. The only thing my mother told us about him wasthat his family was very poor. My mother sent yams and rice, and our old clothes, to hisfamily. And when I didn't finish my dinner, my mother would say, “Finish your food!Don't you know? People like Fide's family have nothing.” So I felt enormous pity forFide's family.Then one Saturday, we went to his village to visit, and his mother showed us abeautifully patterned basket made of dyed raffia that his brother had made. I wasstartled. It had not occurred to me that anybody in his family could actually makesomething. All I had heard about them was how poor they were, so that it had becomeimpossible for me to see them as anything else but poor. Their poverty was my singlestory of them.Years later, I thought about this when I left Nigeria to go to university in the UnitedStates. I was 19. My American roommate was shocked by me. She asked where I hadlearned to speak English so well, and was confused when I said that Nigeria happened tohave English as its official language. She asked if she could listen to what she called my2Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English AnthologyIssue 2 — December 2017 Pearson Education Limited

International GCSE English Language (Specification A) – Paper 1 Section A Non-fiction texts“tribal music”, and was consequently very disappointed when I produced my tape ofMariah Carey.She assumed that I did not know how to use a stove.5055606570What struck me was this: she had felt sorry for me even before she saw me. Her defaultposition toward me, as an African, was a kind of patronizing, well-meaning pity. Myroommate had a single story of Africa: a single story of catastrophe. In this single story,there was no possibility of Africans being similar to her in any way, no possibility offeelings more complex than pity, no possibility of a connection as human equals. So, after I had spent some years in the U.S. as an African, I began to understand myroommate's response to me. If I had not grown up in Nigeria, and if all I knew aboutAfrica were from popular images, I too would think that Africa was a place of beautifullandscapes, beautiful animals, and incomprehensible people, fighting senseless wars,dying of poverty and AIDS, unable to speak for themselves and waiting to be saved by akind, white foreigner. I would see Africans in the same way that I, as a child, had seenFide's family. But I must quickly add that I too am just as guilty in the question of the single story. Afew years ago, I visited Mexico from the U.S. The political climate in the U.S. at the timewas tense, and there were debates going on about immigration. And, as often happensin America, immigration became synonymous with Mexicans. There were endless storiesof Mexicans as people who were fleecing the healthcare system, sneaking across theborder, being arrested at the border, that sort of thing.I remember walking around on my first day in Guadalajara, watching the people going towork, rolling up tortillas in the marketplace, smoking, laughing. I remember first feelingslight surprise. And then, I was overwhelmed with shame. I realized that I had been soimmersed in the media coverage of Mexicans that they had become one thing in mymind, the abject immigrant. I had bought into the single story of Mexicans and I couldnot have been more ashamed of myself.So that is how to create a single story, show a people as one thing, as only one thing,over and over again, and that is what they become. 7580Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and tomalign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. Stories can break thedignity of a people, but stories can also repair that broken dignity.The American writer Alice Walker wrote this about her Southern relatives who hadmoved to the North. She introduced them to a book about the Southern life that theyhad left behind. “They sat around, reading the book themselves, listening to me read thebook, and a kind of paradise was regained.”I would like to end with this thought: that when we reject the single story, when werealize that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise.Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English AnthologyIssue 2 — December 2017 Pearson Education Limited3

International GCSE English Language (Specification A) – Paper 1 Section A Non-fiction textsFrom A Passage to Africa, George AlagiahAlagiah writes about his experiences as a television reporter during the war inSomalia, Africa in the 1990s. He won a special award for his report on theincidents described in this passage.I saw a thousand hungry, lean, scared and betrayed faces as I criss-crossed Somaliabetween the end of 1991 and Dece